Category Archives: coronavirus

Sri Lanka’s Democratic Hopelessness … & Failures from Way Back

Profeesor Ekanayake, in Colombo Telegraph,  21 March 2022, where the ttitle reads “The Millions Who Hurt Without A Change Of Heart”

This article is not primarily about the woeful record of the present government. Nor is it about the abomination of governance by family oligarchy in whose stranglehold a nation groans in every part as if being slowly crushed by the constricting coils of some giant Anaconda. Rather it is about the attitude character and mindset of 6.9 million people who with their eyes open provoked this catastrophe. Before coming to that one can of course say a lot more about the dimensions of this catastrophe and point the accusing finger at bad people in high positions who to be sure will carry the guilt of their monumental crimes and misdemeanors beyond the grave into the fires of eternal hell. But to be explicit about such matters here might be both unsafe and unnecessary.

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Extra! Extra! Living with Omicron in Australia

Maani Truu, in ABC News, 29 January 2022, where the title runs thus: “After the peak: What’s in store for Australia now that the Omicron wave has turned?

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Serbia, Rio Tinto, Novak Djokovic and Australia’s Rancid Hypocrisy  

Fair Dinkum

Serbian Prime Minister Ana Brnabić has announced her country is expelling Rio Tinto as it pulls out of the Jadar lithium project, costing Australia $3.6 billion. Brnabić told reporters: “All decisions (linked to the lithium project) and all licences have been annulled.” She went on to conclude: “As far as project Jadar is concerned, this is an end.”

Serbian Prime Minister Ana Brnabić speaks during a news conference after a Serbian government session about Rio Tinto, in Belgrade, Serbia, January 20, 2022.

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Covid Immunity: Issues ….. Growing Experiences

Maani Truu, in ABC Net, 17 January 2022, where the title reads “Can you catch COVID twice? Or does it give you greater immunity?”

Central Coast resident Mitch Rogers has just come out of two weeks of complete isolation, which he says was “pretty tough”. After contracting COVID early this year, the 32-year-old, who lives by himself, retreated to his Umina Beach home to ride out the symptoms. They ended up taking 14 days to subside, double the mandated seven-day isolation period.

 

More and more Australians have now had COVID-19. But that doesn’t mean they’ll never catch it again. (Pexels: Pixabay) Continue reading

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Paul McNamee steps into the Djokovic Courtside Drama

Paul McNamee in The Age, 15 January 2022, where the title reads “Djokovic an easy target in anti-vaxxer witch hunt”

Clearly, the outcome of the Federal Court case on Sunday has implications for Novak Djokovic. How about for the Australian Open?

The Australian Open is far and away Australia’s biggest international sporting event. Hosting all the world’s best tennis players in arguably the best sporting precinct in the world, it generates close to one billion dollars in economic impact for the state of Victoria. It puts Melbourne front and centre on the world stage for two weeks but, this year, for all the wrong reasons.

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The Covid Phenomenon deciphered by a Committed Worker in Mannar Island

Jeremy Liyanage

Hi Michael,  Thanks for asking these important questions. I live with some frustration over what the mainstream media reports and what my almost daily research of the Covid phenomenon world-wide since March 2020 is telling me.

For us in Mannar, our experience tells us that the Covid ‘crisis’ is a real case of smoke and mirrors here in Sri Lanka. There is little accuracy regarding anything Covid-relatedof because the data is significantly corrupted or not kept at all. As for us it is good to have a grounded vantage point here in Mannar with ‘whistle-blowers’ within the system who report what is really going on and the fudging of figures. Directives from higher up to report many non-Covid related deaths as Covid ones also skewes the numbers. Also at the Mannar hospital all pneumonia and influenza cases – which historically are considerable in number – are now classified as Covid.

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Djokovic and the “Secretary-Bird”

Michael Roberts

When my wife and I went on a Safari tour in Zimbabwe in the 1990s I was fascinated by sightings of a “Secretary Bird” through my binoculars. The official identity of this strange figure  was Sagittarius serpentarius.”   But, in my reading and juxtaposition, its upright walking stance simply indicated a prim and proper secretary persona.           

When I first saw Novak Djokovic on the tennis court, I immediately associated the two figures.  Maybe a strange leap; but it is a fixed asociation im my mind –one which did not, and does not, degrade my admiration for Djokovic’s tennis. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Australian Government’s Covid-Policy as Totally Shambolic

Dr. Kerryn Phelps, in The Guardian, 4 January 2022, where the tile runs  thus: “A shambolic mess’: the only example Australia is giving the world now is how not to manage Covid”

Where did it all go wrong? How did Australia go from being the envy of the world with our best practice public health measures, low case numbers, a prepared health system and an economy ticking along nicely to what can only be described as a shambolic mess?

The only example Australia is providing to the world now is a warning about what not to do with the Covid-19 pandemic.

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USA’s Hegemonic Designs Sustain A Dangerous Wonderland

 Jean-Pierre Page, whose preferred title is “The Longer Telegram and “sleepy Joe”in Wonderland!

The Biden Administration appears to be implementing most of the recommendations in the Atlantic Council’s Longer Telegram: Toward a new American China strategy, an important strategic document about US policy towards China published in January 2021.  This document is one of a troika produced by the Atlantic Council; the other two are Global Strategy 2021: An Allied Strategy for China, published in December 2020 with a preface by Joseph Nye, and The China plan: A transatlantic blueprint for strategic competition, published in March 2021.

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Israel buoyant from the Efficacy of Booster Vaccines

Tom Joyner and Fouad AbuGhosh,  at ABC net, 29 October 2021, …. where the title runs this  COVID-19 is here to stay, but Israel shows that boosters, masks and vaccine passports can tame the virus”

It was the first country to vaccinate, the first to reopen, then the first to widely implement a booster shot.  Now Israel is returning to life close to normal only six weeks after the peak of its worst COVID-19 wave yet. In mid-September, new infections of the Delta variant had surpassed 10,000 per day and hospitals were groaning under the pressure. But today, its restaurants are bustling, cinemas and theatres are packed, university lecture halls are full and the major airport is heaving.

Deaths and new infections have plummeted to the single and triple digits, and the country will be welcoming overseas tourists from November 1.

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