Category Archives: tourism

Treasures Big and Small around Galle Fort and Port

Admiral Ravindra C Wijegunaratne,* in Island, 5 September 2020, where the title runs “From the tallest clock tower to smallest sand clock in Sri Lanka”

Galle is a fascinating place to work in. I was the Commander Southern Naval Area (Comsouth) from 3rd August 2008 to 10th August 2009. For me nothing was more refreshing than the early morning beach run on the world famous Unawatuna beach as well as the one-kilometer swim (before tourists invaded the beach).

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Galle Fort: Demography, 2018

The Population of Galle Fort in 2018

Muslims                    561

Sinhalas                     432

Tamils                          14

Malays                         02

Burghers                     02

Foreigners                  60 …… Total 1071        

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Eduard Hempel Flourishes in Galle and Lanka

SinhaRaja Tammita-Delgoda, in Sunday Island, 26 July where the title is A Seeker after Many Truths, The Lives of Eduard Hempel”

The canoe nudged its way through the deep brown water. It was thick and heavy, like treacle and the boat inched towards a tree trunk on the river bank. The boat sat low in the water, barely a few inches above the river. “Closer, closer,” said the voice at the stern. “I can’t really see it.”

“Well I can,” protested the voice from the bow. “Its close enough, isn’t it?”

” No, its okay. It doesn’t seem to be moving.” All of sudden the tree trunk moved. Coming suddenly to life, it slid down the river bank, crashing into the water.

“Don’t worry, they are much bigger on the Zambezi. It’s probably scared of us. That was why it was rushing into the water. Look they are all doing that.”

There was a series of splashes, each one louder than the other.

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Underwater Scenes off Ceylon from Mike Wilson and Rodney Jonklass in 1958

Beneath the Seas of Ceylon
Today’s throwback from the BSAC archives is a documentary from 1958 which, according to one source we found online, has been lost without a trace – but we have it! This 16mm film was the first underwater one to be shot in the seas around Ceylon, Sri Lanka and features some breathtaking scenes of Rodney Jonklaas taming some very large groupers, and then being chased by sharks 🦈#

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Australians in Limbo: Morrison’s Government under Siege

Andrew Taylor & Tammy Mills, in Sydney Morning Herald, 11 July 2020, with this title

Australians living overseas have criticised the Morrison government’s decision to make it harder to return home, while forcing people to pay for two weeks in quarantine has been labelled as “almost cruel”.

Matthew Spence worked in the aviation industry in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, until he was made redundant on June 30. Mr Spence said flights from Malaysia to Sydney were sparse, and he was booked on the first available flight on July 18. “I am concerned that the intake cut will result in flight cancellations, further adding to the stress of Aussies trying to return,” Mr Spence said. “If you are an Australian citizen you have the expectation that you can always return home when you need to.”

Kerryn Finnis (right) has been separated from her fiance Nick (left) by the travel restrictions Australia has imposed. 
Kerryn Finnis (right) has been separated from her fiance Nick (left) by the travel restrictions Australia has imposed. 

Prime Minister Scott Morrison ordered airlines to slash the number of flights and available seats to Australia from Monday to reduce the number of international arrivals in a bid to relieve pressure on hotel quarantine.

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A Sinhala Peasant’s Ancient Wattle and Daub Hut?

Michael Roberts

I wonder how many people exploring the range of ruins at Polonnaruwa visit the Museum maintained by the Archaelogical Department (located near the rest house on the edge of the Parakrama Samudra? Its items are not brilliant, but there is some interesting fare. But let me pinpoint the pinnacle exhibit: a reconstruction of what today’s scholars think the everyday Sinhala cultivator lived in: a wattle and daub hut.

This edifice has been constructed beside the Museum, It is more than a little worse for ware ….. but the dilapidation adds lustrous realism to the scenario

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Unseen Menial Hands that sustain Our Tourist Beaches

While middle class community organisations that organise beach clean-ups along the Colombo foreshore and at other resorts do receive a modicum of publicity, there are other hands in menial roles devoted to the cleanliness of Sri Lanka’s beaches and/or the security of the hotel surrounds. Let us salute them.

These men sweeping and cleaning up the beach at Nilaweli beach were, as far as I could gather, employees of the village council rather than the hotel nearby

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Amplifying Antiquity within the Galle Fort with Imaginative Restoration

Smrti Daniel, in Sunday Times, 12 July 2020, with this title “Fortifying Galle Fort. A massive project aims to restore the defence works from our colonial past”

As restrictions around the pandemic eased this month, a team of workers returned to Galle Fort. They are in the middle of a two-year restoration project that has them clambering over the great bastions, excavating echoing underground chambers and clearing out an ancient drainage system – all part of an ambitious effort to restore this UNESCO World Heritage Site to its full glory.

Conservation of the gun platforms of the Neptune Bastion

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Wunderbar! Twin Elephant Calves born at Minneriya

…. and Brian Almeida and yours truly were there yesterday 15th July to snap the herd from as close as one is permitted …. though mother elephant and a coterie of aunts made it difficult for amateurs with ordinary cameras to secure a clear shot of the twins huddled together under the mother’s broad back and tummy

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Four Beach Icons at Nilaweli

Four ICONS in front of my chalet at TRINCO BLU Hotel at Nilaweli Beach

* stray dog

* ancient anchor

* palm tree

* palmyrah tree

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