Category Archives: world events & processes

Ceylonese Volunteers in the Midst of Trench Warfare Carnage – World War One

Suren Ratwatte, whose chosen title reads as Battle of the Somme and the Trinitians at the frontlines” …. while his text has had Highlights imposed by The Editor, Thuppahi

Suren Ratwatte writes about the bloodiest chapter in the history of the British Army in WW II, where his grandfather Sir Richard Aluwihare and three other schoolmates faced the brunt of enemy fire.

What remains today: The trenches in France where the 29th Division (among whom were the young soldiers from Ceylon), fought in 1916. Pix by Suren Ratwatte

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Prsessures on Sri Lanka: Weerasekera’s Analysis in Lucid Prose

Michael Roberts

By pure chance I came across a paperback book of 280 pages published by Dharshan Weerasekera via Sarasavi Publisher in 2020 that is entitled Sri Lanka’s Future Challenges and the Quest for a New Constitution. Further searches indicated that he had received university education in USA and had published a battery of books (now listed in Thuppahi at ………….. https://thuppahis.com/2023/03/24/dharshan-weerasekeras-array-of-essays-and-books.

 

 

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Keenie Meenie Mercenary Operations in Lanka in UK Gunsights

Phil Miller, in Declassified UK, March 14, 2023

A former SAS commander whose mercenary business in Sri Lanka is under investigation for war crimes has left millions of pounds in his will.

     Attached photo of Colonel Johnson leading an SAS parade in 1960. (Image: Imperial War Museum)

One of Britain’s most rapacious mercenaries amassed a fortune worth £4m before his death in 2008, an investigation by Declassified UK has found. The soldier of fortune, Colonel Henry ‘Jim’ Johnson, was once described by a senior British diplomat as having “political ideas [that] are probably to the right of Genghis Khan” – a reference to the infamously brutal Mongol emperor.

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Dharshan Weerasekera’s Array of Essays and Books

Author Archive for Dharshan Weerasekera

International Law Implications of Canadian Parliament’s Motion on ‘Tamil Genocide’

Saturday, November 26th, 2022

By Dharshan Weerasekera Courtesy The Island On 18 May 2022, the Canadian House of Commons adopted without opposition a motion introduced by Rep. Gary Anandasangaree recognising 18 May of each year as Tamil Genocide Remembrance Day” (www.parliament.ca). This follows a Bill adopted by the Ontario legislature in May 2021 calling for the week following May […]

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An ODE for Those Who Fought COVID

Rukshan Perera’s ODE in Appreciation of the Frontline Workers who battled and Still Battle COVID

 Thanking the Frontline Heroes in a song – When the world is at a standstill with Coronavirus Covid-19, let us pray for our heroes who are working day and night to save lives and bring the world back on track. This is a dedication to our heroes – healthcare workers, armed forces and all others on the frontline sacrificing their lives to save us from this unimaginable pandemic, Covid-19 Coronavirus.

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Australia’s Deep Shit! New Zealand Shuns AUKUS

Raucous Aucous … with highlighting imposed by Thuppahi

A:  A Report from New Zealand: (see news headline in Appendix).  They are not interested in Aukus or Quad and wish to keep right out of it which is ironic as the Philippines, an Asian country, wants to dig their noses right in it.

Former NZ Prime Minister Helen Clark says, “New Zealand interests do not lie in being associated with Aukus” because it would damage their foreign policy, which is a very strong statement.

Unlike the Philippines, New Zealand is not aligned with the US military, nor does it wish to do so. That will irritate Australia as well.

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Peter Jennings presents A Manifesto For War

Raucous Aukus … in an original essay for Thuppahi, who has taken the liberty of inserting highlights selectively

Peter Jennings is without doubt the most odious and dangerous warmonger in Australia today. His frequent writings in The Australian demonstrate an absolute hate for dissenting or opposing voices. He claims to be a man of peace, yet his writings read like a Manifesto for War.  He has reiterated that bipartisan support for Aukus is fundamental to keeping it going, and that politicians on all sides must stand united with Aukus and America and resolutely against China.

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Sri Lankan Military in Judicial Gunsights Over May 2009 Incidents

Groundviews, 14 March 2023, where the title reads “Military to Face a Day of Reckoning Over the Disappeared”

In a landmark case last month, the Vavuniya High Court ordered the army to produce three LTTE members who had surrendered to the military in May 2019 and have been missing ever since, in response to a habeas corpus case filed by their wives.

 

 

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Port Project in Solomon Islands for China

Reuters Item, 22 March 2023

The Solomon Islands has awarded a multi-million-dollar contract to a Chinese state company to upgrade an international port in Honiara in a project funded by the Asian Development Bank, an official of the island nation said on Wednesday.

The United States and its allies, including Australia, New Zealand and Japan, have held concerns that China has ambitions to build a naval base in the region since the Solomon Islands struck a security pact with Beijing last year.

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Incarceration Camps in the Pacific Theatre of World War II Deciphered

Anoma Pieris presents her work on “Pacific War Incarceration Camps” . to the world 

While there have been many excellent studies on colonial penal environments in the Asia Pacific region, mainly prisons, very few scholars have approached the wartime internment and prisoner of war camps associated with the Pacific War as comparable carceral spaces that might offer deeper insights into imperial and national forms of political sovereignty and border conflict. There are few comparative studies across geographical areas or imperial regimes. Sarah Kovner’s book Prisoners of Empire: Inside Japanese POW Camps (Harvard University Press 2020), though focused on Japanese military imperialism, is important for that focus, and increasingly, several anthologies have offered us a similar analytical breadth by juxtaposing numerous national perspectives. The Architecture of Confinement: Incarceration Camps of the Pacific War (Cambridge University Press, 2022) is similarly ambitious in its scope. It uses the arc of the Pacific Basin to frame a comparative study including Australia, Singapore, North America and Japan as important nodal points in the wartime incarceration camp geography. Its aim is to investigate the impact of the war on settler societies, more so than on the imperial contestants dominating both theatres of World War II.

Anoma Pieris and Lynne Horiuchi at former Cowra POW Camp site in 2016 … photo: Anoma Pieris.

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