Category Archives: Australian culture

Reflections on Arjuna’s Review of the 1996 World Cup Triumph

Michael Roberts, courtesy of Colombo Telegraph …. https://www.colombotelegraph.com/index.php/reflections-on-arjunas-review-of-the-1996-world-cup-triumph/

Arjuna Ranatunga’s timely recollections and assessments of Sri Lanka’s cricketing triumph at the Final of the 1996 World Cup at Lahore on March 1996 add up to a master class – balanced, wide-ranging, revelatory and judicious within the space limits of a news-item.

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Arjuna Ranatunga’s Wide-ranging Review of the World Cup Win in March 1996

Arjuna Ranatunga, in The Island, 7 March 2021, where the title runs thus: Our fans were our biggest strength,” ….. with the highlights being the intervention of The Editor, Thuppahi

During one of my visits to South Africa, I came across an interesting saying — If you want to go fast, go alone. But if you want to go far, go together.’ 

This sentence is so true. As we celebrate the Silver Jubilee of us winning the World Cup, we owe the success to our wonderful team spirit. I treat each of the other 13 members of the World Cup-winning squad not as teammates, but as brothers. They mean so much to me. And I know they will do anything for me. This was the secret of our success.

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Rise in Anti-Chinese Sentiments in Australia

Naaman Zhou, in The Guardian, 4 March 2021, with this title “How Anti-Chinese Seniment in Australia seeped into the Mainstream”

  Photograph: Torsten Blackwood/AFP/Getty Images

Community members say current levels of anti-Chinese sentiment have been fanned by the pandemic, Donald Trump’s rhetoric, souring trade relationship and a political atmosphere that encourages a ‘creeping distrust’ of Australians of Chinese heritage. 

Threatening letters sent to Asian councillors and a surge in race hate attacks during the pandemic has renewed calls for a centralised hate tracker.

Councillor Kun Huang received [a hate] letter on a Monday. Among the insults about his name, the threats of death, the blame for the Covid-19 pandemic, the accusation that he had been stealing all the milk powder, buying up all the houses and bringing disease to Australia “for centuries”, the staff at the Cumberland Council noticed a name and an address. This was a race hate letter signed by its supposed perpetrator.

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Sink Holes. That Sinking Feeling! Cave Diving

 Natsumi Penberthy, in Australian Geographic, 28 April 2010, where the title runs thus: The new extreme: Underwater cave diving”

CAVE DIVERS BRAVE TIGHT spaces, confusing tunnels and all the inherent dangers of taking a mammalian body underwater – just to float through some of the last lost worlds.

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Evenitude: Regular ‘Clients’ at Belair National Park

Cameraperson Amateur being Michael Roberts

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Sunil Wettimuny. Stylish Opening Batsman — Felled Twice … Remains Indestructible

Alston Mahadevan:  “Sunil Wettimuny was a stylish opening batsman”

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Murugappan Asylum-Seeker Family on Verge of Legal Victory and A Return to Biloela

Nick Pearson in 9news, 16 February 2021, where the title reads Biloela family spared deportation for now, but remain on Christmas Island”
The Federal Court has stopped the deportation of a family from the Queensland town of Biloela, upholding a decision made in April 2020 which the Department of Home Affairs had sought to have overturned. But Priya and Nades Murugappan and their two young children will remain in Christmas Island Detention Centre for now. The Murugappan family’s lawyer Carina Ford are now considering an appeal to get the family back to their home in Biloela.

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Coming of Age: A Cricketing Landmark in March 1996 … with Pictures

Michael Roberts, 4 February 2021

Today, 4th February 1948, as we mark the day when Sri Lanka (aka Ceylon) secured political independence, I present a cohort of photographs marking the moment when Sri Lanka’s cricketers battled through fire to claim adulthood in the field of cricket.

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QAnon Right-Wing Extremists and Scott Morrison: Ominous Togetherness

 and in an essay in 2019 which gains relevance in the light of the recent events in Capital Hill in Washington …. This essay was entitled Revealed: the QAnon conspiracy theorist who is friends with Australian PM Scott Morrison”

A significant Australian proponent of the QAnon conspiracy theory is a family friend of Scott Morrison, and his wife is on the prime minister’s staff. The sprawling, disjointed and incoherent QAnon conspiracy variously claims that Donald Trump is leading a behind-the-scenes fight against a shadowy deep state, that powerful forces are hiding and protecting satanic paedophile rings, and that a secretive individual named Q leaves clues for his followers to decipher on internet forums.

 

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Red Letter Day for Women: Penetration of Cricket Umpiring Heights

ESPNcricinfo staff ………. https://www.espn.com.au/cricket/story/_/id/26615484/claire-polosak-make-history-first-female-umpire-men-odi

Australia’s Claire Polosak will make history on Saturday as she becomes the first female umpire to stand in a men’s ODI when she officiates in the final of the World Cricket League Division 2 between Namibia and Oman.

PLUS: For the first time in 144 years of Test-match cricket, a womanAustralia’s Claire Polosak  has officiated in the longest format of the game, as the fourth or reserve umpire, in the third Test between Australia and India, which started at the SCG on Thursday.

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