Category Archives: Australian culture

Hurdling Back Home to Adelaide

Michael Roberts

SYDNEY to ADELAIDE:  Having been informed on Thursday night that I had no Covid and would receive CLEARANCE  I proceeded to pack and on FRIDAY the 1st October confirmed my ticket booking to Adelaide that afternoon on JETSTAR [an airline which permitted extra luggage].

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Filed under accountability, Australian culture, coronavirus, cultural transmission, ethnicity, human rights, landscape wondrous, medical puzzles, rehabilitation, security, transport and communications, trauma, travelogue, unusual people, world events & processes

Jitto Arulampalam ‘s TBG Diagnostics at the Frontline inCovid TestKits

News Item in Ozlanka = http://www.ozlanka.com/2020/05/26/australias-tbg-diagnostics-headed-by-sl-entrepreneur-receives-ce-mark-for-covid-19-test-kits-looking-for-manufacturing-facility-in-sl/

TBG Diagnostics Limited (TDL), a global molecular diagnostics company, headed by Sri Lankan entrepreneur Jitto Arulampalam, announced that its subsidiary, TBG Biotechnology Corp, has received CE Mark approval for its COVID-19 Nucleic Acid and Antibody Rapid test kits.

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Redemption Christmas for the Burghers in Sydney This November

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Fortitude: Murali’s Fight to stay on the Field

Andrew Fidel Fernando. in Cricket Monthly within ESPNcricinfo, 11 August 2020, where the title runs  “Growing up with Murali,”

Ten years after he retired, a reflection on what Muttiah Muralitharan has meant – and means – to a nation

Before I watched an umpire no-ball Muttiah Muralitharan at the Melbourne Cricket Ground, I had no idea that cricket mattered.

Security personnel and spectators look on next to a giant cutout of Sri Lankan spin bowler Muttiah Muralitharan erected on a 17th century Dutch-built fortress during the third day of the first test cricket match between India and Sri Lanka in Galle, Sri Lanka, Tuesday, July 20, 2010. (AP Photo/Eranga Jayawardena)

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Cultural Cross-Fertilization as the Road to Amity

Raj Gonsalkorale, in DailyFT, 4 August 2020, with this title “The Northern Province: The centre for Tamil culture in Sri Lanka”

As much as the Sinhala Buddhist culture and its richness should be recognized, the Tamil culture, in particular the Tamil Hindu culture and its universality, too needs to be recognized. All Sri Lankans should be proud that the country has two such ancient cultures as its foundations.

– Pic by Shehan Gunasekara

http://www.ft.lk/columns/The-Northern-Province-The-centre-for-Tamil-culture-in-Sri-Lanka/4-704036

 

Culture is the characteristics and knowledge of a particular group of people, encompassing language, religion, cuisine, social habits, music and arts. … The word “culture” derives from a French term, which in turn derives from the Latin “colere,” which means to tend to the earth and grow, or cultivation and nurture.

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Donald Friend assessed by Venerable Bhikkhu Dhammika in 2003

In this era of political correctness and moral extremism exemplified in the Me Too movement, the assault on ‘offensive’ statues of famous men with questionable attributes, etc, etc, let me tweak the nether regions of these evangelical reformists by featuring Donald Friend, an Australian homosexual and paedophile of a brazen disposition, who displayed a wide range of artistic talents and happened to sojourn in Ceylon for quite a while — linking up with the talented and wealthy Bawa brothers (themselves members of the gay middle class community in the island’s tolerant ‘climate’– an environment that also attracted Arthur C. Clarke) …. Michael Roberts

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A Chinese Lankan Aussie Chef stimulates Appetites in Darwin

News Item in Daily News, 11 July 2020, with this title  “A serendipitous taste of SL, China and Australia”

The celebrity chef turned television presenter originally from Sri Lanka now making waves in Darwin gives Jordan Kretchmer of Gourmet Traveller a taste of the Top End and shares his love of rare seafood delicacies.

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Professor Tarun Weeramanthri jets in from Perth to Aid Victoria

Media Announcement on June 2020: “WA to provide assistance to Victoria’s COVID-19 response”

  • Highly experienced WA Public Health official deployed to Victoria
  • Professor Tarun Weeramanthri to support the escalating public health response
  • Western Australia providing remote contact tracing support

Western Australia is providing support to Victoria as it tackles a concerning increase in COVID-19 cases, deploying one of the State’s most experienced public health physicians, Professor Tarun Weeramanthri.

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An Unknown Aussie in India: A Covid Travel Saviour …. Simon Quinn

Richard Guilliatt, in The Australian Weekend Magazine 20-21 June 2020, where the title is

Simon Quinn is a 32 year old PhD student from Australia, studying Sanskrit living in Gurgaon 30km South West of Delhi. When the Indian government announced a sudden & draconian nationwide lockdown on 24th March, to halt the spread of Covid19 among the nation’s 1.38 billion people, he logged on to a chat forum for Aussies travelling in India on his lap top. Anxious messages were flooding in.

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Buckingham Palace Secrets around 1975 Whitlam Dismissal

Max Kostowski, in Sydney Morning Herald, 16 June 2020 “National Archives still declassifying Palace Letters as historian slams delay”

The National Archives of Australia has not ruled out taking more than three months to declassify the potentially explosive ‘Palace Letters’, remaining tight-lipped on a release date almost three weeks after the High Court ordered the documents to be made public.

Gough Whitlam, pictured in 1972, established the predecessor to the National Archives. Historian Jenny Hocking has long been seeking papers relating to his dismissal from office.Gough Whitlam, pictured in 1972, established the predecessor to the National Archives. Historian Jenny Hocking has long been seeking papers relating to his dismissal from office.CREDIT:GEORGE LIPMAN

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