Category Archives: australian media

Two Sri Lankans in Victoria’s Cricket XI …Hallelujah!

Michael Roberts

Two players of Sri Lankan parentage are presently playing for Victoria in their Sheffield Shield game. The 31 year-old medium-pace bowler Ruwantha Prasad Kellepotha has joined  Chandrasinghe  in the Victorian Eleven

 Kellepotha is aged 31 years and was born in Kandy but educated at S. Thomas College, Matale. He is primarily a leg-break bowler.

Ashley Philip Chandrasinghe is just about 21 years of age  … birthday coming up on December. He is primarily a left-hand opening batsman, thoug h he can bowl leg-breaks and googlies. His entry into the Victorian squad at sucha young age suggests great expectations in the Victorian cricket community.

Russell Gould’s article below provides several interesting sidelights.

Russell Gould: “New Victorian batting star reveals his links to Test star Usman Khawaja” ..…………  There’s already a buzz about Ashley Chandrasinghe after his debut century and if he follows his hero there’s a Test in his future.

New Victorian batting sensation Ashley Chandrasinghe has found a friend in Test opener Usman Khawaja but hasn’t quite worked up the courage to ask for a connection to his batting hero.

The elegant 20-year-old left-hander made an eye-catching, and unbeaten, century on Sheffield Shield debut against a Tasmanian attack featuring former Test quicks Peter Siddle and Jackson Bird last week that immediately put him in the spotlight.

As he reflected on his breakthrough innings Chandrasinghe, who is of Sri Lankan descent but Victorian born, said he “owes Australia everything”. He revealed Aussie Test great Mike Hussey was the man he modelled his batting on as he made his way through junior cricket.

Victoria’s new head of cricket is David Hussey, Mike’s brother, but the low-profile Chandrasinghe, who made 119 not out while facing 334 balls in that ultra-impressive debut innings, hasn’t asked for a hook-up just yet.

Ashley Chandrasinghe receives his debut cap from Chris Rogers. Picture: Steve Bell/Getty Images

Ashley Chandrasinghe receives his debut cap from Chris Rogers. Picture: Steve Bell/Getty Images

And while plenty have put the prospect of a Test call-up in Chandrasinghe’s own future, he’s more concerned about just getting another game for the Vics.

“Any kid playing cricket aspires to represent Australia and get the baggy green,” he said at the Junction Oval on Thursday. “It’s definitely something you want to strive towards. I’ve only played one game, so I’m just trying to take it each game as it comes – if that comes further down the line, then so be it.

“I suppose it gives you a bit more perspective and context when you achieve the things you have been wanting to achieve and you look to push further a little bit as well. But I’m still just trying to work towards the next game and keep getting better. I try not to put any pressure on myself … just try to do as well as I can and keep pushing for Victoria.”

Chandrasinghe said he did make a connection with Khawaja as a rookie while attending his first Australian Cricketers’ Association players’ day. Having previously told the story of how the Test star told himwe’re the only brown ones here, we’ve got to stick together”, Chandrasinghe said Khawaja made him feel immediately comfortable in a room full of stars he looked up to.

“I didn’t really know anyone there and I was just really excited to be in a room with some well-established players,” he said. “I was by myself and (Khawaja) came over to me and introduced himself and we sort of got talking and he was just really good to talk to and what he’s gone through at the highest level.

“He said we have to look out for each other a little bit.”

Chandrasinghe stunned with an unbeaten century on debut. Picture: Steve Bell/Getty Images

Chandrasinghe stunned with an unbeaten century on debut. Picture: Steve Bell/Getty Images

Chandrasinghe said he “definitely” surprised himself with his first innings for Victoria despite having been a prolific century-maker at all levels below first-class cricket.

It was an innings, however, that gave him confidence to kick on having battled his own way to the big stage after falling out of most junior pathways.

“The route I took, I’m really happy I was able to push my way through that. I wouldn’t change anything,” he said.

“At the time when I was in the junior pathways I thought it was the end of the world when you don’t really do that well. But as long as you find a way and keep pushing through, you can reach the end goal.”

Chandrasinghe will next be in action for Victoria when they face Queensland at the Gabba, starting next Thursday.

NOTE

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The Hypocrisy of Democracy

Fair Dinkum, in an EMAIL COMMENT which Thuppahi has presented to the world with his okay … with highlighting added

 Here the UK’s 800 millionaire PM Rishi Sunak declares that the UK police have his full support to clamp down on illegal protests,  and that he plans to introduce new laws to give police greater powers to clamp down on protestors.  Meanwhile, at the same time , he calls on China to respect the right of Chinese people to protest as a fundamental human right, as evidence emerges of direct British interference into China to provoke protestors into fermenting chaos.

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The Story of a Masterpiece … and Its Painter Donald Friend

Dr Srilal Fernando, in The CEYLANKAN. Journal No, 100, November 2022, pp. 41-43

In 1969 James Gleeson, a well-respected authority on Australian painting, wrote a book called the Masterpieces of Australian Painting. It covered a full range of Australian painting from the colonial period up to the 1960’s. Of the nearly 75 artists selected, one was Donald Friend, who as most of the readers know spent 5 years in Ceylon, as a guest of Bevis Bawa. Of all the paintings by Friend he selected one which was titled The Puppets.

 

The painting done in 1965 in Australia after returning from Ceylon by Donald Friend, but before he settled down in Bali.

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Michael Wille: A Necessary Hero

Eardley Lieversz

I spoke to Michael Wille over the phone on 7th July of this year. I was visiting a former neighbour and she got Michael on the line.

I confessed to him that he was my first cricketing hero and that the 1957 Royal-Thomian was the first one I remember watching. I repeated what my dad told me about him sleeping on his late father’s bed before the game.

 

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Perseverance Delivers Degree & Fulfilment for Tania Murphy nee Van Heer

Tania Murphy’s Memo to Michael Roberts in Response to Request**

Hope you have had a great week so far! I have enclosed the uni letter. I, however, have already sent you some insights on my athletics journey a few days ago.

As for my university experience, I started out wanting to gain a qualification to enable me to secure permanent employment and realised that I had to get a university qualification to enable this to happen. I had put this part of my life on hold because of my commitments to athletics and the traveling that came with it. Later on, when I had a family and put it on hold again and then, one day, I had a conversation in the gym I worked at with another member about her son’s involvement with international development. Prior to this day, I did not know a degree like this existed. After learning about this degree from this lady, I realised what I wanted to study.

Aug 1999: Portrait of Tania Van Heer of Australia during the 200 Metres at the 1999 World Championships held at the Estadio Olimpico in Seville, Spain. Mandatory Credit: Gary M Prior/Allsport

 

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Potential for Terrror Attacks within Australia Now Lower

Clive Williams, in The Australian, 30 November 2022, where the title reads thus:  “Threat ‘lower’ but face of domestic terror is changing” ….

The announcement by ASIO director-general Mike Burgess that the terrorism threat level in Australia has been lowered from “probable” to “possible” reflects the view of the National Threat Assessment Centre that a terrorist incident here is now less likely.

An older woman praying and giving offerings at the ground zero site of the 2002 Bali bombings in the tourtist district of Kuta, Bali.

 

 

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The Travails of War in Lanka Underscored in a New Play in Sydney

Steve Dow @dowsteve  in a review in The Guardian, 18 November 2022… the play being entitled “The Jungle and the Sea” 

Sri Lankan civil war drama lifts joy above traumThis play by the xcreaators of the Helpmann-winning Counting and Cracking shows people living and loving despite danger, but sometimes minimises the horror.

 Blindfolded matriarch Gowrie (Anandavalli) and her firebrand daughter Abi (Kalieaswari Srinivasan) in The Jungle and the Sea at Belvoir St theatre in Sydney. Photograph: Sriram Jeyaraman

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Viva! The CEYLANKAN reaches Twenty-Five

The Ceylon Society of Australia was launched in Sydney in the late 1990s and established branches in Melbourne and Colombo. They also launched a journal entitled THE CEYLANKAN twenty-five years back and the 100th number of this wide-ranging publication hit the posts, desks and couches of its subscribers this week. Hurrah! 

These publications have sustained the critical patriotic commitments of Sri Lankans in Australia and abroad in numerous ways; while also stimulating cross-ethnic interaction among some of the Sri Lankan migrants in Australia.

 

Hugh Karunanayake: Founder President, 1998-2004

 

 

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A Massacre at Adelaide Oval: Indian Cricketers Eviscerated

Somachandra Skandakumar …. writing from the hills of Uva in Sri Lanka

In lighter vein….
No 10 Downing Street has issued a Show Cause to two Englishmen, as to why they should not be prosecuted for having massacred Eleven Indians at Adelaide on 10th  November”
🤭🤗😂

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Hayden for Pakistan: Hayden’s Post-Match Speech goes Viral

Andrew McMurtry in Foxsports.com ….. … https://www.foxsports.com.au/cricket/t20-world-cup-2021/matthew-haydens-pakistan-speech-goes-viral-after-world-cup-miracle/new

Aussie cricket legend Matthew Hayden’s inspirational dressing room speech after Pakistan made the T20 World Cup semi-finals has gone viral. The former Aussie opener was the batting coach for Pakistan at the last World Cup and was reappointed a mentor for the 2022 edition in Australia.

A first up loss to India in one of the all-time classic T20 Internationals followed by a shock one-run upset to Zimbabwe meant the nation’s fate was out of its hands.

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