Category Archives: australian media

Harrowing Background for Cricket in Galle

Sam Goodwin, in Yahoo!sport,  29 June 2022,  where the title runs thus“Harrowing detail in photo of Aussie cricketers on Sri Lanka tour”

Australia's cricketers, pictured here in Sri Lanka during the nation's economic crisis.
The Australian cricket tour of Sri Lanka is taking place during the nation’s economic crisis. Image: Getty/Twitter

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Only in Australia: Meaningful Roadsigns

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A Slashing Picture of Australia’s Policy towards Boat People

Binoy Kampmark, in The Island, June 2022, where the title reads “

When it comes to the tawdry, hideous business of politicising the right to asylum, and the refugees who arise from it, no country does it better than Australia.  A country proud of being a pioneer in women’s rights, the secret ballot, good pay conditions and tatty hardware (the Hills Hoist remains a famous suburban monstrosity) has also been responsible for jettisoning key principles of international law.

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An Australian Minister’s Homespun Reading of Sri Lanka’s Crisis

#7NEWS #BREAKINGNEWS #srilanka

DR KEITH SUTTER : Sri Lanka in TURMOIL – worst economic crisis in 70 years | 7NEWS …..June 21, 2022 ………………………27,741 views

7NEWS Australia

Australia’s Home Affairs Minister has travelled to Sri Lanka after hundreds of asylum seekers have been turned back in recent weeks. The country is struggling with its worst economic crisis in 70 years. Leading to shortages of food, medicine and fuel. And prompting fears of growing social unrest

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May Day Worldwide? The Energy Crisis in Australia Today

Editorial in THE AGE, 17 June 2022, …. https://www.theage.com.au/national/energy-crisis-should-hasten-push-into-renewables-20220617-p5auk5.html

If anything good has come out of this week’s energy crisis it is the realisation that our electricity market is no longer fit for purpose – that after years of inaction we have finally been found out. The question is: what, exactly, can be done?

Australia heavily relies on gas and coal but is shifting towards renewables.Australia heavily relies on gas and coal but is shifting towards renewables.CREDIT:GETTY

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Ashton Agar’s Sri Lankan Lineages

Michael Roberts

Ashton Agar may play cricket now for Western Australia, but he is the eldest of three boys schooled at the De La Salle College in Melbourne. Our investigations indicate that his father John Agar is from a cricketing family associated with the Prahran Cricket Club in Melbourne – a happy coincidence because Prahran had several Burgher migrants active within its portals—notably Owen Mottau and Dav Whatmore.[1] As vitally, his mother Sonia is a Sinhalese Sri Lankan, being the daughter of Nala Hewawisa[2] from a marriage with Sheila Plunkett,[3] who is described in one source as a “Burgher of British descent.”

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A View of Australia from ORCADIAN somewhere in the Orkney Islands

Orcadian, responding to an Email circulated by Thuppahi conveying the views of JOHN LANDER,  circulated by Senaka Weeraratne

John Lander, a former Australian ambassador, gives a most thoughtful analysis on the fictions of the China threat. Western diplomats need to return to the basics of what makes for good diplomacy. We are increasingly seeing Western diplomats becoming irrational, bordering on insane.

 

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Face-to-Face in the Solomon Islands: Two Global Giants

Scott Ritter, in Global Times, 27 May 2022, where the title reads “Chinese diplomacy in South Pacific upends US-Australian security plans”

The visit by Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi to the Solomon Islands on May 26, part of a 10-day tour of the South Pacific, including Kiribati, Samoa, Fiji, Tonga, Vanuatu, Papua New Guinea, and East Timor, has stoked western fears about growing Chinese influence in the region. Upon his arrival to the capital Honiara, the Chinese Foreign Minister is expected to sign cooperation agreements with the Solomon Islands.

Chinese State Councilor and Foreign Minister Wang Yi (left) holds arms with Solomon Islands Prime Minister Manasseh Sogavare after arriving in Solomon Islands for a visit on May 26, 2022. Photo: Courtesy of Chinese Ministry of Foreign Affairs

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Australia’s “Whitey” Parliament of Yesteryear

Frances Mao, BBC News, Sydney 20 May 2022, where the title runs as “Australia election: Why is Australia’s parliament so white?”

 Some of Australia’s MPs, pictured here, fail to reflect the country’s diversity, critics say

Australia is one of the most multicultural nations in the world, but it’s a different story in the country’s politics, where 96% of federal lawmakers are white. With this year’s election, political parties did have a window to slightly improve this. But they chose not to in most cases, critics say.

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Gerd von Dincklage: Snorkeller & Traveller Extraordinary

Michael Roberts

Gerd von Dincklage-Schulenburg seems to have been a world traveller and adventurer with daring do.  Of German stock he was in Ceylon in the 1950s  and cut quite a figure in Royal College and at the Kinross Swimming Club at Wellawatte beach according to Hugh Karunanayake  (a Royalist now living in Melburne) who had this to osay: “He cut quite a figure with his long hair and riding his motorbike bare bodied through the streets of Colombo.  He lived somewhere near Flower Road and attended Royal College for a couple of years.”

What is more, von Dinklage and Hugh Stewart were “were the first to introduce  snorkelling and spear fishing into Sri Lanka. I think their base was the Kinross Swimming Club in Wellawatte” according to my niece Barbara Webster nee Stewart (of Perth now). Hugh, certainly, stoked my interest in snorkelling around Galle fort.

Be that as it may, we are fortunate that Barbara was able to supply a photograph, a faded one, of the two young adventurers at Kucheveli when the Stewart family were on holiday there.

Barbara adds: “It was taken when the family were holidaying at Kuchevali. The two men were very good friends, excellent swimmers and adventurers. ”

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