Category Archives: communal relations

Full Frontal: Confronting Diaspora Tamil Canards in Canada

Legal fund for fighting against Bill 104 TGEWA

https://www.gofundme.com/f/legal-fund-for-fighting-against-bill-104Sri Lankan Canadian Action Coalition is organizing this fundraiser.

Campaign to repeal Tamil Genocide Education Week Act (TGEWA), for the sake of all Sri Lankans

Dear Friends,
The Ontario provincial government of Canada passed a law on May the 6th to educate all Ontarians on a Tamil Genocide in Sri Lanka. The bill 104 that was passed is titled Tamil Genocide Education Week Act (TGEWA). Now, the schools in Ontario have no choice but to teach Tamil Genocide in Sri Lanka as a curriculum element, especially during the week ending May the 18th, every year. This is a myth propagated by the Pro-LTTE Tamil diaspora, which despite not having a single shred of solid evidence keeps on repeating a lie, hoping that it would be established as fact.


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Introducing the Ceylon National Congress: Its Agitation & Its Context

Michael Roberts

The four-volume edition of DOCUMENTS OF THE CEYLON NATIONAL CONGRESS was presented by the Department of National Archives in 1977 and has been out of stock for some time now.

Haris De Silva — Deputy Director, DNA in the 1970s

Volume ONE contains a book within a book written by me and entitled ELITES, NATIONALISMS and the NATIONALIST MOVEMENT IN BRITISH CEYLON – in seven chapters and running to ccxxii pages.

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Apoyi !@!!@!! …… Lankaava Today

……………… and Just Yesterday in Easter 2019

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Reviewing the Past with KP …. Pirapaharan’s Best Man & Organisational Genius

Sri Lanka Guardian interview with KP, 4 June 2021, where the title runs thus “Selvarasa Pathmanathan alias KP speaks after years of silence”

The story of a man who transformed his life to shelter and educate hundreds of kids affected during armed conflict and due to social disparity in Sri Lanka. He is widely known as KP. Selvarasa Pathmanathan is now a social activist and founded the North-East Rehabilitation and Development Organization

When the world’s one-time most wanted man is given the chance to speak, what does he say? When he is given the chance to walk freely, where does he go? When he is given time and freedom, what does he do?

 KP in Kilinochchi ( Pic by Lakshman Dias for Lanka Courier) 

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Video: Launch of Lord Naseby’s Paradise Lost. Paradise Regained

Amal Abeyawardene

March 29, 2022 Colombo at the BMICH (Bandaranaike International Conference Hall) Lord Michael Naseby launches his book, Sri Lanka: Paradise Lost, Paradise Regained.

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Nationalisms in Ceylon: Origins, Stimulants and Ingredients

Michael Roberts, … reproducing Chapter III in Volume I of Documents of the Ceylon National Congress and Nationalist Politics in Ceylon, 1929-1950, Vol I, 1977, Department of National Archives, 1977 , pp. lxviii–lxxviii **

While the political activists of the first half of the twentieth century were drawn from both the national and the local elites, the political leadership (at significant island-wide levels) was largely composed of individuals who could be ranked among the national elite. As indicated earlier, the national elite was a small segment of the Ceylonese population. Its levels of wealth, power and status, its lifestyle, and its value-system marked it off from the rest of the population.

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CMM Jubair: Josephian Cricketer & First Muslim Doctor in Lanka

Avishka Mario Senewiratne, whose preferred title reads  “The Josephian Cricketer who became the First British Qualified Muslim Doctor of Sri Lanka”

Small by area, large in diversity and history is the country, Sri Lanka. We, since the early Aryans came to the island, experienced the arrival of nations, either friendly or dominating, from the east and west. Some left, some stayed. Those who remained became us. We strived to accept this diversity. Yet, rulers tried to exploit us, by dividing and ruling. Beautiful is it to see people from all walks of life, irrespective of class, caste, creed and race working together and of course studying.

 

 

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Filed under communal relations, cricket for amity, cultural transmission, economic processes, education, ethnicity, heritage, historical interpretation, life stories, Muslims in Lanka, performance, self-reflexivity, sri lankan society, tolerance, unusual people

Chance Events in the Making of the Four-Volume Documents of the Ceylon National Congress

Michael Roberts

 In 1977 a sizeable stock of historical manuscripts was made available to the public by the Department of National Archives in four volumes entitled Documents of the Ceylon National Congress and Nationalist Politics in Ceylon, 1929-1950. This outcome was the result of a substantial body of work. It was also the outcome of several fortuitous encounters.

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Blanketing Operations in the British Heights revealed by Lord Naseby

Shamindra Ferdinando

Member of House of Lords, Michael Naseby, has assured [us] that he will try very hard to convince the UK to make public the sections of the Colombo British High Commission dispatches censored by London, pertaining to the last phase of the Vanni offensive. Lord Naseby gave this assurance at the launch of his memoirs, ‘Paradise Lost, Paradise Regained’ at the BMICH on Tuesday (29).

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Turmoil Looming in Sri Lanka … April 1st … Not A Joke

Tisaranee Gunasekara, in Sri Lanka Guardian, 1 April 2022, where the title reads  “Sri Lanka: On Protests”

I don’t know who is organising the Sunday’s planned protest. For me, that mystery is a serious problem. This is not a Hollywood movie, a Lankan version of V for Vendetta. 

On November 2019, 6.9million Lankans overestimated the intelligence, capacity and compassion of the Rajapaksa brothers. That mistaken assessment was the root cause of the tragedy we are living through today as individuals and as a nation. Should we now compound that error by fatally underestimating their will to power?

The aftermath of the protest against the Government yesterday in Colombo suburb 

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