Category Archives: Britain’s politics

Ukridge of Uxbridge, Ukridge of Ukraine

Michael Patrick O’Leary, aka Padraig Colman, presenting an essay that did not make the top grade

 To help me through these troubled times, this sordid age, I have been bingeing on the oeuvre of the Divine Plum, Pelham Grenville Wodehouse.

The Age of Aquarius has long departed. We are now living in the Age of Ukridge, a time of fact-free posturing. This is the Age of Systemic Deceit, the post-truth era. Once a lie finds a sympathetic ear, rebuttals, facts, will not persuade people that it is not true. To believe anything else would create a sense of cognitive dissonance. Memories of corrections fade rapidly, but the memory of the original lie remains. Goebbels had something to say on this subject. Media scholar Caroline Jack coined the phrase “unintentional amplification”, which in turn leads to another phenomenon which she identifies as “inadvertent legitimisation” – the act of giving credibility to “strategic lies” simply by repeating them. In Truth and Truthfulness, his last published book, philosopher Bernard Williams focused on what he identified as the “virtues” of truthfulness, Accuracy and Sincerity. We can’t get along without trust (human flourishing creates a “need for cooperation” (b) but trust requires truthfulness, and (c) truthfulness presupposes that there are (at least some) truths. For Williams, lies are pernicious for at least two reasons: (1) the liar betrays the trust of the dupe; and (2) the liar exerts power over the dupe, manipulating his or her beliefs and thus (potentially) his or her choices. Today, all citizens are taken for dupes and patsies, marks in the great political confidence trick.

Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under accountability, authoritarian regimes, Britain's politics, British imperialism, centre-periphery relations, disparagement, foreign policy, governance, historical interpretation, life stories, politIcal discourse, power politics, self-reflexivity, the imaginary and the real, truth as casualty of war, Ukraine & Its Ramifications, war reportage, world events & processes

The Hypocrisy of Democracy

Fair Dinkum, in an EMAIL COMMENT which Thuppahi has presented to the world with his okay … with highlighting added

 Here the UK’s 800 millionaire PM Rishi Sunak declares that the UK police have his full support to clamp down on illegal protests,  and that he plans to introduce new laws to give police greater powers to clamp down on protestors.  Meanwhile, at the same time , he calls on China to respect the right of Chinese people to protest as a fundamental human right, as evidence emerges of direct British interference into China to provoke protestors into fermenting chaos.

Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under accountability, australian media, authoritarian regimes, Britain's politics, British imperialism, centre-periphery relations, China and Chinese influences, disparagement, economic processes, foreign policy, governance, historical interpretation, Pacific Ocean issues, politIcal discourse, power politics, self-reflexivity, truth as casualty of war, world events & processes

No Trust in Truss

Michael Patrick O’Leary, in his web column where the title runs thus: “Out of the Blue” being a review of thethe Liz Truss biography authored by Harry Cole & Richard Heale  ………. A shorter version of this article was published in the Sunday Island on November  6 2022 …. https://island.lk/?s=out+of+the+blue

Continue reading

2 Comments

Filed under accountability, Britain's politics, citizen journalism, disparagement, economic processes, electoral structures, female empowerment, governance, historical interpretation, life stories, performance, politIcal discourse, power politics, taking the piss, unusual people, world events & processes

Remembering the War Dead in UK ….. and Lanka

Kumar Kirinde et al in the RAFOA circle

Ref to the subject, each year on 11th November, Britain and the Commonwealth countries remember their war dead in a formal manner by laying Poppy wreaths at their respective national war memorials and war graves related to those fallen in battle and those who died while in service during the two World Wars. 11th November  1918 is the day WW1 came to an end with the signing of the Armistice. Hence this day is considered as the remembrance day.

Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under accountability, Britain's politics, British colonialism, centre-periphery relations, cultural transmission, Empire loyalism, ethnicity, heritage, historical interpretation, Indian Ocean politics, landscape wondrous, law of armed conflict, life stories, nationalism, patriotism, performance, politIcal discourse, power politics, security, self-reflexivity, sri lankan society, the imaginary and the real, truth as casualty of war, war reportage, world events & processes

Sunak: A Searching Appraisal of The Man & His ‘Field of Play’

Michael Patrick O’Leary, in his website where the title reads thus “Sunak as Prime Minister”

 

 

 

“A bright and decent man with bad ideas.” The Economist.

Continue reading

1 Comment

Filed under accountability, Britain's politics, economic processes, governance, heritage, historical interpretation, life stories, modernity & modernization, patriotism, performance, politIcal discourse, power politics, social justice, welfare & philanthophy, world events & processes

%d bloggers like this: