Category Archives: cultural transmission

Fairyland! Cricket in Khettarama! ….. Forgetting the Politico-Economic Hellhole Beyond

Andrew Fidel Fernando, in ESPNccricinfo, 22 June 2022,…. where the title reads In a parallel universe, Sri Lanka offer a glimpse of normal, happier times”

Is this it? Have they arrived? Is this the new Sri Lanka? The future? Bright? Blinding as the sun? Fairyland!

Sri Lanka celebrate after clinching victoryAFP
Energy. Remember that? Batters who will whisk the team out of a hole. Bowlers who will make an anthill of a target seem like a forbidding Himalayan peak. Fielders who don’t comically clang into each while circling under a gently descending catch. It has been long enough. Too long. Years since #SangaMahelaDilshanMalingaHerathMurali.

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Passionate Sri Lankan Fans awarded “MoM” Award

Errol Fernando, adjudicating from Melbourne, decided that the MAN of the MATCH Awad should be presented to the awesome, ……….. jolly, …….passionate Sri Lankan fans

From: Errol Fernando
Sent: Wednesday, June 22, 2022 10:08 PM
To: sunil perera <sunilp1943@gmail.com>
Subject: RE: 3rd ODI

Apart from giving my ‘Man of the Match’ to a batsman or bowler, Sunil, I have also over the years given it to the umpire, third umpire, groundsman, coach, selector or sports psychologist. Sometimes even to the player’s wife, the Woman of the Match. Recently, in the Lord’s Test, I gave it to the ball because it was the actual change of ball that enabled England to beat New Zealand.

Yesterday, in the series-deciding  game at Colombo there were contenders such as Asalanka who were more than worthy of MOM. However, my winners were  the spectators. They were wonderful   –   passionate, ecstatic, deliriously happy and an inspiration to the players.

Fantastic achievement from Sri Lanka to win the series.  Nice to finish with a 4-1 result tomorrow………………..All the best, …………………….. Errol

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Galba’s Tales of Parliamentary Affairs from the Inside: “Wow”!

Hugh Karunanayake, … with the title and the highlighting being impositions by The Editor, Thuppahi

Nihal Seneviratne, the former Secretary General of Sri Lanka’s Parliament which he served with distinction and diligence for 33 years, has published his autobiographical memoir entitled “Memories of 33 years in Parliament”.  Written in a very readable, chatty style of prose, it is indeed a compendium of the highlights of the nation’s legislative workings over the past three decades

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Leonard Woolf in Pictures: New Finds

Michael Roberts

I have chanced upon several ‘new’ photographs of Woolf –some on his own and a few with his wife Virginia. I present them here as another ‘chapter’ in the Leonard Woolf series in Thuppahi. They are placed in rough chronological order on the basis of my readings of his age in each picture.  Repetition has been avoided –so they make up a supplement to the previous items on Woolf placed in Thuppahi this year.

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Sandadas Coperahewa’s Lifework

A Bibliography of Published/Unpublished Work by Sandadas Coperahewa (1923 – 2022)


Books:
යුර ෝපා කලාරේ ලුහුඬු ඉතිහාසරේ සිංහල රපරැළිය හා යුර ෝපා කලා රහළ කලා සසදුව (1958)
[The Sinhala Translation of R.H. Wilenkski’s A Miniature History of European Art and a Comparative Study of European and Sinhalese Art]
 රෙරේ හිමි සෙරුව ( 1991) …. [A commemorative poem on Ven. Pamburana Metteyya Thera of Vajirarama]
 ජගේ කලාකරු කතන්ද – 1 : රලරයෝනාරදෝ දා වින්ි (1992)
 ජගේ කලාකරු කතන්ද – 2 : ෙයිකල් ඇන්ිරලෝ ( 1997)
 ජගේ කලාකරු කතන්ද – 3 : ෆාරයල් ( 1998) …………………. A series of books on World famous artists – Leonardo Da Vinci, Michelangelo and Raphael 

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Community Kitchens: New Charitable Avenue in Crisis Situation in Sri Lanka

News Item in Daily Mirror, 17 June 2022

Sri Lanka is seeing the first signs of some sections of the community thinking of whether the ‘neighbour’ had his or her meal. Just the other day ‘Sarvodaya’ together with ‘Singularity Sri Lanka’ organised a ‘community kitchen’ to ensure that people in the Grandpass area had a solid meal for dinner. The food kitchen was held on June 14 at the St. Joseph’s Church in Grandpass and as many as 1700 people were fed. For the record dry rations were also distributed.

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Vale: Two Appreciations of Sandadas Coperahewa

Mevan Pieris, presenting the Funeral Oration for Sandadas Coperahewa, teacher of S.Thomas’ College Mt Lavinia, Tuesday 7th June 2022.... [with highlighting imposed by The Editor, Thuppahi]

We are gathered here this evening to pay our final respects to a great teacher. In my days in the School by the sea in the 1950s and 1960s, Mr Sandadas Coperahewa was my revered teacher in art and Sinhala, and I thought I should pay a tribute to him as he is the last of my teachers to depart with all other sacred spirits who taught me having gone ahead.

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Test Cricket of a Different Kind in 1948

Dr. Srilal Fernando in Melbourne, reproducing an essay that appeared originally in The CEYLANKAN, a quarterly produced by the Ceylon Research Society in Australia**

Early last year [probably 2004] I received a call from Michael Ludgrove the then head of the rare book section at “Christies” Auction house requesting help to decipher the names of Ceylonese cricketers who had signed a cricket bat in the 1930’s following a combined India-Ceylon match against the visiting MCC. This led to my keeping an eye out for unusual items on Ceylon cricket. A few months later a set of autographs came up for sale. They were of the visiting English women cricketers who played a match in Colombo, against the Ceylon women in the first “test” of its kind. I was lucky to trace two of the test cricketers from the Ceylon team who now live in Victoria, Beverly Roberts (Juriansz) and Enid (Gilly) Fernando. Incidentally Gilly is called Gilly after AER Gilligan the Australian Cricketer and answers to no other name.

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Pete Seeger: Songs from the past still relevant for our time

Tony Donaldson

Let me present three different types of songs performed by Pete Seeger in 1960 – a lullaby, protest song, and an entertainment song.

Seeger said learning another language is like entering the soul of another people. He included in his repertoire songs from all over the world, including this gentle Indonesian lullaby called Suliram, which was traditionally sung to children in Indonesia and Malaysia at bedtime. Here is the first verse with an English translation.

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Leonard Woolf’s Remarkable Novel

Nick Rankin, in BBCnews, 23 May 2014, where the title runs thus: “Leonard Woolf’s forgotten Sri Lankan novel” …… The Bloomsbury Group and Sri Lanka are rarely spoken of in the same breath, but that is partly because Leonard Woolf’s groundbreaking first novel, The Village in the Jungle, is unjustly ignored, argues writer and broadcaster Nick Rankin.

She was born Virginia Stephen, daughter of the Victorian bookman Sir Leslie Stephen, but when she married in 1912, her name changed to Virginia Woolf, and she went on to become the best-known woman writer of the 20th Century.

 

Her lesser-known husband, Leonard Woolf, however, wrote and published a novel first. That almost forgotten book, first published in 1913, is called The Village in the Jungle and it is a remarkable work because it is the first novel in English literature to be written from the indigenous point of view rather than the coloniser’s.

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