Category Archives: religiosity

St. Josephs College in Colombo: Its Multi-faceted Achievements over 125 Years

Lynn Ockersz, in The Island, 13 June  2022, where the title runs thus St. Joseph’s College, Colombo – a dignified 125 years”

One hundred and twenty-five years into its existence, St. Joseph’s College, Colombo remains dignified and spiritually-focused in the Sri Lankan school system. Its achievements have been numerous and multidimensional over the decades but if one were to sum up the essential identity of the College, then, spiritual development would be the phrase to choose.

Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under charitable outreach, cultural transmission, economic processes, education, heritage, historical interpretation, landscape wondrous, life stories, patriotism, performance, religiosity, sri lankan society, teaching profession, unusual people, welfare & philanthophy

Sri Lanka’s Fallen Remembered at Battaramulla Monument on 19th May

The 19th May marks the final defeat of the LTTE and its Eelam Movement …. Thuppahi **

The 13th anniversary of National War Heroes’ Day was commemorated in a simple ceremony this afternoon (May 19) at the Battaramulla National War Heroes’ Monument with the attendance of Commander -In-Chief President Gotabaya Rajapaksa as the Chief Guest

Standing L-to-R: 

Secy Def Gen Kamal Gunaratne, Maj Gen Nandana Senadeera (retd) Chairperson Ranaviru Seva Authority; President Gothabaya,  Genl Shavendra Silva, the Commander SL Navy and the Commander SLAF.

Continue reading

2 Comments

Filed under accountability, governance, heritage, historical interpretation, Indian Ocean politics, landscape wondrous, life stories, LTTE, meditations, patriotism, performance, politIcal discourse, propaganda, Rajapaksa regime, religiosity, self-reflexivity, Sinhala-Tamil Relations, Tamil Tiger fighters, trauma, truth as casualty of war, unusual people, world events & processes

“The Last Post” — Its Origins and History

A BBC News Item20 January 2015, entitled  “The story of the Last Post”  

The Last Post will be played all over the world on Remembrance Day. But as Alwyn W Turner explains, its origins had nothing to do with mourning.

Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under accountability, art & allure bewitching, cultural transmission, heritage, historical interpretation, landscape wondrous, life stories, meditations, patriotism, performance, religiosity, self-reflexivity, trauma, travelogue, unusual people, world events & processes

No Balls! Mahinda Rajapaksa stripped ….

His situation in April-May 2021 ….

Continue reading

1 Comment

Filed under accountability, art & allure bewitching, authoritarian regimes, Buddhism, centre-periphery relations, cultural transmission, disparagement, governance, heritage, historical interpretation, landscape wondrous, life stories, patriotism, performance, politIcal discourse, power politics, religiosity, self-reflexivity, slanted reportage, sri lankan society, taking the piss, trauma, unusual people, vengeance, world events & processes

A Quaint Catholic Church within the Fort of Galle

St. Josephs Chapel featured at https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=&ved=2ahUKEwizvIeNvL_3AhUQ7XMBHcasCGwQFnoECAwQAQ&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.trulysrilanka.com%2Fattractions%2Fst-josephs-chapel.html&usg=AOvVaw1SsgUEFkNvvWOYjQdlKGkb

Sri Lanka is a country with a long and storied colonial history and heritage. For centuries the island had significant interactions and conflicts with the sea-faring Europeans who had begun to colonise all over Asia. Sri Lanka has now been independent for more than seven decades, but the legacy and impact of its colonial overlords is still apparent if you take a look around its most important cities. For example, colonial influences are apparent all throughout the coastal city of Galle – from the iconic Galle Fort to the Colonial History Museum. But one attraction that might fly under your radar is the St Joseph’s Chapel – a quaint little Roman Catholic Church that’s nestled away amidst the sleepy streets of the city.

Continue reading

8 Comments

Filed under architects & architecture, art & allure bewitching, British colonialism, cultural transmission, heritage, historical interpretation, landscape wondrous, life stories, religiosity, sri lankan society, world events & processes

Anzac Day, 25th April. Dying for Country ….. Sacrificial Devotion

Michael Roberts

On the 25th of April, ANZAC DAY, Australia honoured its war dead in ceremonies large and small throughout the country. This moment has been marked every year –beginning with a ceremony in London in 1916 which recognised the deadly toll and the bravery shown on the Gallipoli Peninsula in Turkey where so many colonial Aussies fought … and died … on behalf of the British state (their “mother-country” to many Aussies then).

Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under accountability, Australian culture, australian media, centre-periphery relations, cultural transmission, Eelam, ethnicity, governance, heritage, historical interpretation, jihad, landscape wondrous, law of armed conflict, life stories, LTTE, martyrdom, military strategy, modernity & modernization, nationalism, patriotism, politIcal discourse, power politics, prabhakaran, religiosity, self-reflexivity, Sinhala-Tamil Relations, sri lankan society, Tamil Tiger fighters, the imaginary and the real, unusual people, vengeance, war reportage, world events & processes

Buddhist Temples in Lanka: Evocative Thoughts

Uditha Devapriya, in The Island, 9 April 2022, … With input from and photographs by Manusha Lakshan … & bearing this title  “Some reflections on the temples of the South”

The social and cultural history of Buddhist temples in Sri Lanka has been the object of study for well over a century. Far from receding into a world of their own, these temples occupied a prominent place in the world around them. Buddhist monks lived under a code of piety and self-denial, and they operated under their own rules and customs. Yet despite being cut off from mundane concerns, they were very much linked to the society they hailed from. Granted entire villages for their upkeep, the clergy made use of the social institutions of their time, most prominently caste, to maintain their hold.

 

 Ceityagiri, 

Dharmasalava, Pushparama Continue reading

4 Comments

Filed under ancient civilisations, architects & architecture, art & allure bewitching, authoritarian regimes, British imperialism, Buddhism, centre-periphery relations, cultural transmission, economic processes, ethnicity, heritage, historical interpretation, Indian religions, Indian traditions, island economy, landscape wondrous, life stories, meditations, nationalism, paintings, patriotism, performance, pilgrimages, politIcal discourse, Portuguese imperialism, power politics, religiosity, religious nationalism, self-reflexivity, travelogue, world events & processes

Obeyesekere’s New Book on the Kandyan Kingdom

Uditha Devapriya, reviewing Gananath Obeyesekere’s new book The Many Faces of the Kandyan Kingdom (1591-1765) Colombo, Perera-Hussein, 2020, 200 pp., Rs. 1,200 ... with ‘arbitrary’ highlighting imposed by the Editor, Thuppahi

In 1602, the year of the Dutch East India Company’s founding, Joris van Spilbergen reached the shores of Sri Lanka after setting sail from the seaport of Veere in Holland a year earlier. Tasked with opening up trade negotiations with the King of Kandy, Vimaladharmasuriya, Spilbergen bore with him a letter from the Prince of Orange, acknowledging their willingness to counter the Portuguese. Not for one moment underestimating the Portuguese presence in the island, though, they disembarked at Batticaloa, which fell under the jurisdiction of the Kandyan Court. They anchored off the coast on May 31.

 

Continue reading

1 Comment

Filed under accountability, art & allure bewitching, authoritarian regimes, British imperialism, Buddhism, centre-periphery relations, discrimination, economic processes, ethnicity, heritage, historical interpretation, Indian religions, Indian traditions, Kandyan kingdom, landscape wondrous, life stories, Muslims in Lanka, politIcal discourse, population, Portuguese in Indian Ocean, power politics, religiosity, sri lankan society, the imaginary and the real, transport and communications, travelogue, unusual people, world events & processes

Dissecting Sri Lankan History & Politics through Book Reviews


Sophie Roel in conversation with Razeen Sally on “The best books on Sri Lanka recommended by Razeen Sally”

Many visitors to Sri Lanka have been beguiled by its charms, from its hill towns to its beaches, its ancient temples to its friendly people. And yet, for a quarter of a century until 2009, it was torn apart by a brutal civil war. Here, Sri Lanka-born political economist Razeen Sally, author of Return to Sri Lanka: Travels in a Paradoxical Land, recommends the best books to get a better understanding of Sri Lanka and the complexities that make the country so fascinating to visit and read about.

Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under accountability, atrocities, authoritarian regimes, Buddhism, centre-periphery relations, chauvinism, communal relations, cultural transmission, discrimination, disparagement, economic processes, ethnicity, governance, heritage, historical interpretation, human rights, life stories, plantations, plural society, politIcal discourse, Portuguese in Indian Ocean, power politics, Rajapaksa regime, religiosity, self-reflexivity, sri lankan society, the imaginary and the real, transport and communications, travelogue, unusual people, world events & processes

Robert Knox’s Journeys: Producing His Book …. Two

Thiru Arumugam, in The Ceylankan, Vol 25/1, Feb. 2022, where the title reads “A Three Hundred and Forty-Year Book-about-Ceylon”

Captain Robert Knox (1642-1720) of the East India Company
*oil on canvas
*126 x 102.8 cm
*1711
*inscribed b.l.: AEtat: 66
*inscribed b.l.: P: Trampon : Pinx (on the chair)
*inscribed c.r.: R: Knox: (on the quadrant)
*inscribed c.r.: Memoires of my owne Life: 1708 (on the notebook)

 

Continue reading

1 Comment

Filed under Aboriginality, authoritarian regimes, British imperialism, centre-periphery relations, cultural transmission, economic processes, ethnicity, heritage, historical interpretation, Indian religions, Kandyan kingdom, landscape wondrous, life stories, literary achievements, politIcal discourse, religiosity, self-reflexivity, sri lankan society, the imaginary and the real, transport and communications, travelogue, unusual people, world events & processes