Category Archives: travelogue

Harrowing Background for Cricket in Galle

Sam Goodwin, in Yahoo!sport,  29 June 2022,  where the title runs thus“Harrowing detail in photo of Aussie cricketers on Sri Lanka tour”

Australia's cricketers, pictured here in Sri Lanka during the nation's economic crisis.
The Australian cricket tour of Sri Lanka is taking place during the nation’s economic crisis. Image: Getty/Twitter

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Andrew’s Review: Before the Galle Tests Commence

Andrew Fidel Fernando  in ESPNcricinfo, Tuesday/Wednesday

On paper it’s been six years since the Australia men’s side were last in Sri Lanka for a Test tour, but somehow that 2016 tour seems a lifetime ago. Graham Ford was Sri Lanka’s coach then; Angelo Mathews still the captain. For Australia, it was pre-Sandpapergate. Adam Voges was a part of the middle order.

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Only in Australia: Meaningful Roadsigns

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Hail the Sri Lankan Cricket Fans: Joe Paiva’s Pictorial Applause from Adelaide:

Joe Paiva’s Colourful Applause from Adelaide

Congratulations the People of Lanka for welcoming the Aussies with open arms and warm hospitality. This is the Sri Lankan way.

 Cricket Australia take special note and reciprocate, when overseas teams grace our  great, multicultural continent…. Australia. In the past Australia has treated foreign team shabbily. That now must change. It is sport not war. Sri Lanka despite its dire situation has shown the world how it should be done.

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General Custer’s Last Stand: Annihilation by the Sioux, 25 June 1876

David Graham, in Quora, …. https://www.quora.com/What-are-some-of-the-most-epic-last-stands-in-history/answer/David-Graham-149 

On June 25, 1876, after a stumbling night march that exhausted men and horses, Lieutenant Colonel George Armstrong Custer and the 7th U.S. Cavalry attacked Sitting Bull’s village on the banks of the Little Bighorn River in southeastern Montana.

What happened next: Lakota Sioux and Northern Cheyenne warriors under the war chiefs Crazy Horse, Gall and Two Moon wiped out all 210 officers and men in the five companies of cavalry under Custer’s immediate command. 

  Custer marker on Last Stand Hill | Photo: David Graham

 

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Memories are Made of This: The Agar-Hewawissa-Plunkett-Forbes Lineages of Ceylon

Charles Schokman

This picture brought back memories. I knew Ashton Agar’s Great Grandfather from way back in Ceylon (now Sri Lanka). Mr. Plunkett worked at Walker Sons & Co Ltd as a car salesman and resided at Negombo. He had two daughters Sheila and Carmaline. (Bubbles). Sheila was married to Nala Hewawissa and Carmaline to Ron Forbes.

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Senaka Calls for a Ticker-Tape Farewell for the Aussie Cricket Teams

Senaka Weeraratna

Give Aussies a Ticker Tape parade as a farewell gesture by driving them through the streets of Colombo (near Galle Face Green) once this popular Australian cricket tour is over.

This is exactly what the Australians did in Melbourne on February 20, 1961 when they bid goodbye to the West Indian Cricket Team led by Frank Worrell. Australia beat West Indies by 3 to 2 in a close contest which went down to the wire.

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Is China’s Eclectic Mix of Communism with Capitalism a Threat?

Tomasz Kamusella, in The Conversation, 26 October 2021, where the title runs thus “How China combined authoritarianism with capitalism to create a new communism”

After the 1989 fall of communism in the Soviet bloc, five self-declared communist states remain today: China, Cuba, Laos, North Korea and VietnamBelarus and Venezuela can also be added to the mix as they fulfil the criteria of a communist state – even though they do not officially invoke the ideology. So, at present, the number stands at seven. The question is, now that capitalism is the engine of China’s economy, what is communism today? And if the number of communist states is poised to grow in the near future, as some predict, what does this prospect mean for democracy?

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Passionate Sri Lankan Fans awarded “MoM” Award

Errol Fernando, adjudicating from Melbourne, decided that the MAN of the MATCH Awad should be presented to the awesome, ……….. jolly, …….passionate Sri Lankan fans

From: Errol Fernando
Sent: Wednesday, June 22, 2022 10:08 PM
To: sunil perera <sunilp1943@gmail.com>
Subject: RE: 3rd ODI

Apart from giving my ‘Man of the Match’ to a batsman or bowler, Sunil, I have also over the years given it to the umpire, third umpire, groundsman, coach, selector or sports psychologist. Sometimes even to the player’s wife, the Woman of the Match. Recently, in the Lord’s Test, I gave it to the ball because it was the actual change of ball that enabled England to beat New Zealand.

Yesterday, in the series-deciding  game at Colombo there were contenders such as Asalanka who were more than worthy of MOM. However, my winners were  the spectators. They were wonderful   –   passionate, ecstatic, deliriously happy and an inspiration to the players.

Fantastic achievement from Sri Lanka to win the series.  Nice to finish with a 4-1 result tomorrow………………..All the best, …………………….. Errol

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A Slashing Picture of Australia’s Policy towards Boat People

Binoy Kampmark, in The Island, June 2022, where the title reads “

When it comes to the tawdry, hideous business of politicising the right to asylum, and the refugees who arise from it, no country does it better than Australia.  A country proud of being a pioneer in women’s rights, the secret ballot, good pay conditions and tatty hardware (the Hills Hoist remains a famous suburban monstrosity) has also been responsible for jettisoning key principles of international law.

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