Category Archives: environmental degradation

The Precious Landscape and the Beauties of Nature in Mannar …. Now Under Threat?

The Delights of Nature in Mannar

An ancient Baobab tree — a reminder of the links with Arab traders in the medieval and early modern eras

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Fresh EU Assessment of Glyphosate

Conveyed by Chandre Dharmawardena, 25 June 2021: “NEW EU REPORT:  Assessment Group on Glyphosate, 15 June 2021”

Main findings
The dRAR [draft Renewal Assessment Report] consists of 11,000 pages, which is substantially larger than an average dRAR. In comparison, a typical assessment report for an active substance in the EU is less than 5.000 pages.

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Rendering Agriculture in Lanka ARID with Silly Science & Mad Economics

Chandre Dharmawardana, whose preferred title is  “Political Rhetoric, or Sounding the Death Knell of Sri Lanka’s Agriculture?”

A quote attributed to the Greek play write Euripides says that “ Those whom the gods wish to destroy they first make mad”.  Reading the news from Sri Lanka, one can only wonder if a prescient Euripides had Lanka’s successive rulers since 1970 in mind.

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Sri Lanka’s Ecological Crisis in Overview in the Context of the HR Accusations

Asoka Bandarage, in Asia Times, 3 April 2021, where the title runs thus:  ‘Human rights’ and Sri Lanka’s ecological crisis “

A UN Human Rights Council (UNHRC) resolution of March 16 brought extensive charges against Sri Lanka over alleged human-rights violations, but is arguably seriously flawed. Opportunistic and strategic use of human rights by the Western powers to maintain hegemony continually ignores violations of the rights of nature and humanity rooted in the destructive model of economic development the same powers introduced to the world.

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Locals and Environmentalists Challenge An Aussie Sand-Mining Project in Mannar

ABC Science  environment reporter Nick Kilvert and Jane Lee for Science Friction

As a small child, Shreen Abdul Saroor remembers getting up before dawn with her father to spy on the masses of migratory birds that would visit her island. The birds were on their way down the Central Asian flyway — a migration path that crosses 30 countries from Siberia to the Indian Ocean. “We would hide somewhere and … we don’t make any noise,” Ms Saroor recalls. “[Then we’d watch] them coming and landing in the causeway areas and then catching fish and taking off as a huge group covering the entire sky.”

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Port City Colombo 2014-2040 Clarified

SEE  …. LISTEN …

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t2e1xOcGpDc

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Profound & ‘Coloured’ Insights into Our Environmental Degradation

Prasad Abu Bakr, in Sunday Observer, 7 July 2019, …. http://www.sundayobserver.lk/2019/07/07/art/book-review-slow-cooked-thoughts

This is a ‘must-read’ book for those who lived during that glorious past, which is quietly slipping out of our grasp. It is also one for the next generation, who live in a world of make-believe – thinking that demolition of that glorious past and the pristine environment that was there, in the name of ‘development’ is aimed at making the world a better place to live in.

In her Foreword, Jill Macdonald refers to Slow-cooked Thoughts as a compelling compilation of writings both occasional and various, linked by a common motif of the writer’s passionate and unwavering belief of what constitutes a right relationship with the world around us.

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Pictorial and Word ‘Recipes’ for Reflection

Rohan de Soysa’s Thoughts and Snaps

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Galle Fort in Deterioration with ‘Trip-Traps’ and Garbage

Captain Chandra Godakanda Arachchi**, in Island, 31 December 2018, where the title is “I cry for Galle Fort”

The sun rises magnificently above Rumassala. The wind roars during Monsoon with white horses beautifully rolling over. Catamarans are in the bay and children straggle to school. Tourists roam around in Fort. What a beautiful place the Galle Fort used to be when I grew up in the 1960s and first half of 1970s. My days in Galle were very special and precious to me and, therefore, I make it a point to visit Galle regularly even though I have been out of the country, most of my life, since I left Galle in 1975.

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Sri Lanka at the Pinnacle of the World in its Water Supplies

Sudath Gunasekara, in The Island, 16 December 2018, were the title is “ Vision and mission on water management in Sri Lanka!”

A recent study on Sri Lanka has identified it as one of the six countries that share one half of the 0.3% drinkable water this planet has. What is even more important and surprising is that ours has been identified as the only country in the world that will have drinking water even if there is going to be a shortage of drinking water in the whole world. This news has made water the biggest asset and the most valuable commodity of Sri Lanka that has put it on the top of the world.

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