Category Archives: photography

A Rare Photograph of the Old Lighthouse at Galle Fort

Ismeth Raheem ++

Presented here is the stone and concrete lighthouse constructed around 1851-52 at the south-western corner of Galle Fort ………. replacing the cast-iron structure that was specially fabricated in England and shipped to Ceylon. That cast-iron lighting ‘unit’ was burnt down by accident in 1849-50.

The rare image was recently made available to Thuppahi by Bunchy Rahuman — an old Aloysian mate of Michael Roberts and one time resident in the fort.

The image is one of the earliest datable calotype photographs the world has seen. Calotype photographs are partly hand-coloured. Calotype was concurrently invented not soon after the Daguerreotype.

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Gustave Eiffel’s Unique EIFFEL TOWER

Visit https://historia.nationalgeographic.com.es/a/torre-eiffel-construccion-coloso_11345 for the full version of “ARCHITECTURAL CHALLENGE. THE EIFFEL TOWER: THE CONSTRUCTION OF A COLOSSUS”  …………………… an item made available by Capt Kumar Kirinde and his RAFOP collective …. with only some segments reproduced here.

Thanks to his experience in the design of great works of iron, in 1889 Gustave Eiffel managed to erect a tower over 300 meters high for the Universal Exhibition in Paris.

Face of Gustave Eiffel at the base of the tower

Although he was an excellent engineer, Gustave Eiffel’s success rested even more on his skills as an entrepreneur. In 1887 he signed a contract by which the French State and the city of Paris would provide a subsidy of 1.5 million francs; 25 percent of the total construction cost. To obtain the remaining funds, Eiffel created a joint-stock company with a capital of five million francs, half of which was contributed by three banks and the other by Eiffel himself. Despite the fact that the expenses rose 2.5 million more, Eiffel managed to recover the entire investment in a few months thanks to the income from the sale of tickets, which he received by virtue of a 20-year operating license.

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Queen Elizabeth and the Sri Lankan Cricketers, June 1975

Mevan Pieris

I thought it would be interesting for people to see a photograph taken at Buckingham Palace just before the Prudential World Cup matches began in June 1975. Her Majesty the Queen Elizabeth II, hosted for tea all eight teams which participated. This photograph, which is only the right section of the full photograph (selected as all the Sri Lankans are in it), was taken on the flight of steps of the rear of the palace, overlooking a garden.

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Queen Elizabeth in Ceylon in 1954 in Pictures

The Queen and Prince Philip visited the island of Ceylon in 1954 and participated in striking ceremonies in Colombo, Kandy and Peradeniya University. The Senate Building at Peradeniya University was formally ‘consecrated’; and the Queen also visited the Peradeniya Botanical Gardens. The Queen also visited the famous Trinity College with the Mayor of Kandy (EL Senanayake) as Aide of Honour. Here she honoured and was honoured by the Trinity cadet corps …. a set of actions that reminds us of the “Empire loyalism” that had prompted a number of Westernised Sri Lankans to enlist in the British armed forces during World War I as well as World War II (a topic recently documented** in the new illustrated book edited by Kumar Kirinde et al — entitled Volunteers from Ceylon ………………………………………….. (https://thuppahis.com/2022/09/02/fighting-dying-for-britain-during-the-two-world-wars/) and also referred to earlier in a book where I was the chief hand, namely, People Inbetween (Ratmalana, Sarvodaya Publishers, 1989, pp. 114-119 & 121ff ) ………….  MICHAEL ROBERTS

The Mayor of Kandy, Mr. E.L. Senanayake escorting the Queen through the College premises (College car park at present)

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Tamil Civilians as Sandbags in 2008/09 & Blinding Ignorance in Geneva

Lucien Rajakarunanayake in An Article on 11th September 2014 entitled “Sandbags of Humans” in strategy to woo the West” …. with the highlighting being the present impositions of The Editor, Thuppahi

“I come across new evidence regularly in the midst of misinformation and dis-information that is a facet of the propaganda war that has been sharpening since the LTTE began to retreat in 2008. Since the volume of data is huge, a thorough investigation calls for assiduous work by a team which includes those who are culturally competent and able to discern manipulation.”

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A Critical Appraisal of Michael Roberts’s Writings on Eelam War IV

Gerald Peiris …. where the original title was Michael Roberts’ Writings” [1]

Unlike the reports compiled by the ‘UNSG PoE’ and the UTHR-J, the writings by Professor Roberts (hereafter, ‘Michael’ as ’Gerry’ has I have known him during the past 66 years) demonstrates the possibilities and the limitations of the ‘Sporadic Information Method’ in its application to situations such as that of the Vanni war-zone, and how a committed scholar with no axe to grind and no personalised political cause to promote could weigh a mass of information gathered from a miscellany of sources, and arrive at reasonably plausible findings (not that I agree with all such conclusions) without being judgemental and obdurate. His application of this method (in combination other methods of research) in many of his writings has two features worthy of special mention – one, his avid use of photographic records as both embellishments attractive to the reader, as well as evidence meant for reinforcement of what he wishes to convey in the text; and the other, an extraordinarily wide range of personal contact in his sources of information some of which have been conveyed to him orally. Adding to this comment that ‘graphics’ and orally conveyed information have both been prominent ingredients in documentation of information from time immemorial sounds almost banal.

 Analytic Map composed by the Daily Mirror on 24 April 2009 [depicting the battle situation at atime when Tamil civilians were fleeing in droves after the SL army penetrated the last stronghold on 19/20th April 2009]

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Moon Orbit Hoax! The “Moonshine” Trickster world We Live In!

Reuters Fact Check

A video that social media users have claimed shows the moon eclipsing the sun at the North Pole has gone viral with 5 million views on Twitter alone. But the video is CGI and the scene it presents is not realistic.

The video, shared widely online, can be viewed ….(hereherehereherehere and here).

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A Cliffhanger! Sri Lankan Cricketers overcome Stiff Bangladesh Total

Andrew Fidel Fernando, in ESPNcricinfo, 2 September 2022, where the title runs “Sri Lanka: merely lucky, or back to punching-above-weight ways?”

In a match that swung wildly one way, then the other, the optimists among you had reason enough to believe this Sri Lanka team is resurgent.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Asitha Fernando (left) on T20I debut hit the winning runs for Sri Lanka — AFP/Getty Images Continue reading

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The Captivating “Story of Sri Lankan Cricket” by Nicholas Brookes

Martin Chandler:…. in CricketWeb, 14 August 2022, reviewing Nicholas Brookes: An Island’s Eleven: The Story of Sri Lankan Cricket, The History Press, 2022, 535 pp, Rating: 4.5 stars …. with highlighting emphasis imposed by The Editor, Thuppahi

In the final sentence of his preface Nicholas Brookes expresses the view; For as much as I’ve tried to ‘tell the story of Sri Lankan cricket’, this work is merely a starting point. This is, I presume, a reference to the paucity of existing literature on Sri Lankan cricket rather than an attempt to downplay his own contribution to that particularly genre. It is inevitably unfortunate and disappointing that, to date, none of Muttiah Muralitharan, Arjuna Ranatunga, Samantha Jayasuriya, Chaminda Vaas, Mahela Jayawardene, Kumar Sangakkara or Rangan Herath have been persuaded to write an autobiography, but the game in Sri Lanka does at least now have a comprehensive history, and one I hope might become the touchstone for similar histories of the game in Ireland, Zimbabwe and Bangladesh.

The full Sri Lankan training squad in Colombo with the bus taking them to Nuwara Eliya for acclimatization & training prior to the journey to England for the 1975 World Cup  with Asst Manager Neil Perera standing on the left and Trainer Raja Wickremasinghe and Manager KMT Perera standing on the right

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The Flinders Ranges in Australia: A Marvellous Place bidding for World Heritage Listing

David Penberthy in The Australian – “World recognition coming into view for the Flinders Ranges” 

It is one of the most ancient and fossil-rich places on earth, its centrepiece the gigantic Wilpena Pound basin, its towering gums the inspiration for Australia’s greatest landscape painter Sir Hans Heysen.

Flinders Ranges tourism operator Kristian Coulthard with visitors to the “gateway of the Outback”. Picture: Tourism Australia

But beyond South Australia, little is known about the Flinders Ranges, which lie just four hours’ drive north of Adelaide at what’s known as the gateway to the Outback.

 

 

 

 

 

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