Two Sri Lankans in Victoria’s Cricket XI …Hallelujah!

Michael Roberts

Two players of Sri Lankan parentage are presently playing for Victoria in their Sheffield Shield game. The 31 year-old medium-pace bowler Ruwantha Prasad Kellepotha has joined  Chandrasinghe  in the Victorian Eleven

 Kellepotha is aged 31 years and was born in Kandy but educated at S. Thomas College, Matale. He is primarily a leg-break bowler.

Ashley Philip Chandrasinghe is just about 21 years of age  … birthday coming up on December. He is primarily a left-hand opening batsman, thoug h he can bowl leg-breaks and googlies. His entry into the Victorian squad at sucha young age suggests great expectations in the Victorian cricket community.

Russell Gould’s article below provides several interesting sidelights.

Russell Gould: “New Victorian batting star reveals his links to Test star Usman Khawaja” ..…………  There’s already a buzz about Ashley Chandrasinghe after his debut century and if he follows his hero there’s a Test in his future.

New Victorian batting sensation Ashley Chandrasinghe has found a friend in Test opener Usman Khawaja but hasn’t quite worked up the courage to ask for a connection to his batting hero.

The elegant 20-year-old left-hander made an eye-catching, and unbeaten, century on Sheffield Shield debut against a Tasmanian attack featuring former Test quicks Peter Siddle and Jackson Bird last week that immediately put him in the spotlight.

As he reflected on his breakthrough innings Chandrasinghe, who is of Sri Lankan descent but Victorian born, said he “owes Australia everything”. He revealed Aussie Test great Mike Hussey was the man he modelled his batting on as he made his way through junior cricket.

Victoria’s new head of cricket is David Hussey, Mike’s brother, but the low-profile Chandrasinghe, who made 119 not out while facing 334 balls in that ultra-impressive debut innings, hasn’t asked for a hook-up just yet.

Ashley Chandrasinghe receives his debut cap from Chris Rogers. Picture: Steve Bell/Getty Images

Ashley Chandrasinghe receives his debut cap from Chris Rogers. Picture: Steve Bell/Getty Images

And while plenty have put the prospect of a Test call-up in Chandrasinghe’s own future, he’s more concerned about just getting another game for the Vics.

“Any kid playing cricket aspires to represent Australia and get the baggy green,” he said at the Junction Oval on Thursday. “It’s definitely something you want to strive towards. I’ve only played one game, so I’m just trying to take it each game as it comes – if that comes further down the line, then so be it.

“I suppose it gives you a bit more perspective and context when you achieve the things you have been wanting to achieve and you look to push further a little bit as well. But I’m still just trying to work towards the next game and keep getting better. I try not to put any pressure on myself … just try to do as well as I can and keep pushing for Victoria.”

Chandrasinghe said he did make a connection with Khawaja as a rookie while attending his first Australian Cricketers’ Association players’ day. Having previously told the story of how the Test star told himwe’re the only brown ones here, we’ve got to stick together”, Chandrasinghe said Khawaja made him feel immediately comfortable in a room full of stars he looked up to.

“I didn’t really know anyone there and I was just really excited to be in a room with some well-established players,” he said. “I was by myself and (Khawaja) came over to me and introduced himself and we sort of got talking and he was just really good to talk to and what he’s gone through at the highest level.

“He said we have to look out for each other a little bit.”

Chandrasinghe stunned with an unbeaten century on debut. Picture: Steve Bell/Getty Images

Chandrasinghe stunned with an unbeaten century on debut. Picture: Steve Bell/Getty Images

Chandrasinghe said he “definitely” surprised himself with his first innings for Victoria despite having been a prolific century-maker at all levels below first-class cricket.

It was an innings, however, that gave him confidence to kick on having battled his own way to the big stage after falling out of most junior pathways.

“The route I took, I’m really happy I was able to push my way through that. I wouldn’t change anything,” he said.

“At the time when I was in the junior pathways I thought it was the end of the world when you don’t really do that well. But as long as you find a way and keep pushing through, you can reach the end goal.”

Chandrasinghe will next be in action for Victoria when they face Queensland at the Gabba, starting next Thursday.

NOTE

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The Malays of Sri Lanka: A New Book

Alvin Sallay in The Sunday Times, 4 December 2022, … with highlighting imposed by The Editor, Thuppahi

From a language in which many Sinhala terms have originated to relished food including the likes of Nasi Goreng or Pittu, the minuscule Malay community of Sri Lanka has maintained its unique niche in the social fabric of the country for centuries, standing side by side with their brothers and sisters of other communities.

 

 

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Ukridge of Uxbridge, Ukridge of Ukraine

Michael Patrick O’Leary, aka Padraig Colman, presenting an essay that did not make the top grade

 To help me through these troubled times, this sordid age, I have been bingeing on the oeuvre of the Divine Plum, Pelham Grenville Wodehouse.

The Age of Aquarius has long departed. We are now living in the Age of Ukridge, a time of fact-free posturing. This is the Age of Systemic Deceit, the post-truth era. Once a lie finds a sympathetic ear, rebuttals, facts, will not persuade people that it is not true. To believe anything else would create a sense of cognitive dissonance. Memories of corrections fade rapidly, but the memory of the original lie remains. Goebbels had something to say on this subject. Media scholar Caroline Jack coined the phrase “unintentional amplification”, which in turn leads to another phenomenon which she identifies as “inadvertent legitimisation” – the act of giving credibility to “strategic lies” simply by repeating them. In Truth and Truthfulness, his last published book, philosopher Bernard Williams focused on what he identified as the “virtues” of truthfulness, Accuracy and Sincerity. We can’t get along without trust (human flourishing creates a “need for cooperation” (b) but trust requires truthfulness, and (c) truthfulness presupposes that there are (at least some) truths. For Williams, lies are pernicious for at least two reasons: (1) the liar betrays the trust of the dupe; and (2) the liar exerts power over the dupe, manipulating his or her beliefs and thus (potentially) his or her choices. Today, all citizens are taken for dupes and patsies, marks in the great political confidence trick.

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The Hypocrisy of Democracy

Fair Dinkum, in an EMAIL COMMENT which Thuppahi has presented to the world with his okay … with highlighting added

 Here the UK’s 800 millionaire PM Rishi Sunak declares that the UK police have his full support to clamp down on illegal protests,  and that he plans to introduce new laws to give police greater powers to clamp down on protestors.  Meanwhile, at the same time , he calls on China to respect the right of Chinese people to protest as a fundamental human right, as evidence emerges of direct British interference into China to provoke protestors into fermenting chaos.

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Caste in Jaffna

Prashanth Kuganathan** whose title runs thus: “Social Stratification in Jaffna: A Survey of Recent Research on Caste”

A SYNOPSIS: Since 1983, war has dominated the perception of Sri Lanka. This has affected scholarship on the country, such that the subjects of an overwhelming number of research proposals and publications have been on the war and the prospects and prescriptions for peace. This survey paper is an attempt to locate the system of caste in transition in the Jaffna Peninsula by reviewing recent literature written after the commencement of the war. While detailed ethnographies of caste in Jaffna may have temporarily come to a halt, caste practices have not and remain a salient part of everyday life among the Tamils in Sri Lanka. As the war ended in 2009, it is therefore important that social scientists on Sri Lanka revisit the topic of caste, that is an integral part of not just Tamil culture or society, but being Tamil itself. As the study of caste is dominated by research in India, a microanalysis of Jaffna and Sri Lanka, particularly the nuances of this system in transition due to war and militancy, could contribute to the macro-study of caste at a sub-continental perspective.

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An Elephantine Medical Task

… captured on VIDEO =  https://www.facebook.com/messenger_media/?attachment_id=537960471546894&message_id=mid.%24cAABa90sW7s-LCPGyEGE16xlejqgv&thread_id=18411747

…. WELL, NOW,  …..

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Remembering Julia Margaret Cameron

A Julia Margaret Cameron Bibliography

 

At different moments Thuppahi has presented photographs from that remarkable 19th century cameraperson Julia Margaret Cameron (maiden name “Pattle”) who was intimately linked to British Ceylon because her father [error … her husband] was one of the authors of the Colebrooke-Cameron Reports[i] of 1833 and because she chose to settle down in the island and passed away therein in 1879 (and is in fact buried within its churchyards).[ii]

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The Story of a Masterpiece … and Its Painter Donald Friend

Dr Srilal Fernando, in The CEYLANKAN. Journal No, 100, November 2022, pp. 41-43

In 1969 James Gleeson, a well-respected authority on Australian painting, wrote a book called the Masterpieces of Australian Painting. It covered a full range of Australian painting from the colonial period up to the 1960’s. Of the nearly 75 artists selected, one was Donald Friend, who as most of the readers know spent 5 years in Ceylon, as a guest of Bevis Bawa. Of all the paintings by Friend he selected one which was titled The Puppets.

 

The painting done in 1965 in Australia after returning from Ceylon by Donald Friend, but before he settled down in Bali.

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Profound Mementoes for Michael Wille

ONE: A PRAYER for MICHAEL’s PEACEFUL REST

The kids at the Day Care at Bandarawela which Mike supported said a Prayer this morning for his Peaceful Rest.

💛🙏🙏

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Michael Wille: A Necessary Hero

Eardley Lieversz

I spoke to Michael Wille over the phone on 7th July of this year. I was visiting a former neighbour and she got Michael on the line.

I confessed to him that he was my first cricketing hero and that the 1957 Royal-Thomian was the first one I remember watching. I repeated what my dad told me about him sleeping on his late father’s bed before the game.

 

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