Category Archives: landscape wondrous

Hara Kiri by Sri Lankan Cricketers assures Hallelujah for the Aussies at Galle

Michael Roberts

On a wicket with uneven bounce that also supported massive spin the Sri Lankan batsmen proceeded to perform “hara kiri” in a manner that was as comical as disastrous. The second innings scoreline of 113 runs underlines the disaster; but does not quite capture the astounding manner in  which some of the batsmen  contibuted to their dismissal — though one must also record the competent fielding (catched by Labushagne and Swepson) and intelligent bowling).

HARA KIRI = ritual suicide by disembowelment practiced by the Japanese samurai or formerly decreed by a court in lieu of the death penalty  …. https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/hara-kiri#:~:text=Definition%20of%2Sam0 hara%2Dkiri,2%20%3A%20suicide%20sense%201b

 

A Samurai about to commit “seppuku” or “hara-kiri”

Swepson acclaims his wicket

 

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Filed under accountability, art & allure bewitching, Australian culture, cricket for amity, cricket selections, landscape wondrous, life stories, performance, photography, Sri Lankan cricket, world events & processes

Breaking News: Subterfuge via the Obituaries for the Dead

Thalif Deen in New York

When Daya Perera was our UN ambassador, I had a perennial battle of wits -– and, most of the time, he had the last word. He once dismissed news stories in the Lake House newspapers as largely “bogus”. Defending my old establishment, I told him that people in Sri Lanka read the Daily News, at least for its obituaries. And Daya shot back: “Even those obituaries are bogus!”.

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Harrowing Background for Cricket in Galle

Sam Goodwin, in Yahoo!sport,  29 June 2022,  where the title runs thus“Harrowing detail in photo of Aussie cricketers on Sri Lanka tour”

Australia's cricketers, pictured here in Sri Lanka during the nation's economic crisis.
The Australian cricket tour of Sri Lanka is taking place during the nation’s economic crisis. Image: Getty/Twitter

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Andrew’s Review: Before the Galle Tests Commence

Andrew Fidel Fernando  in ESPNcricinfo, Tuesday/Wednesday

On paper it’s been six years since the Australia men’s side were last in Sri Lanka for a Test tour, but somehow that 2016 tour seems a lifetime ago. Graham Ford was Sri Lanka’s coach then; Angelo Mathews still the captain. For Australia, it was pre-Sandpapergate. Adam Voges was a part of the middle order.

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Remembering George Turnour: Scholar & Administrator Extraordinary

Hugh Karunanayake

Thirty seven years ago, on 13 April 1985, the British Prime Minister of the day  Mrs Margaret Thatcher during her visit to Sri Lanka to open the Victoria Dam, said  in an address to the Parliament of Sri Lanka  “The remains of an ancient civilization are visible in many parts of your island. Two thousand years ago, your irrigation system far exceeded in scale and sophistication anything existing in Europe. That great chronicle the Mahavamsa, has passed down to us the story of your island’s development.”

 The Mahavansa and the history it contained would probably  have been lost in the mists of antiquity if not for the  indefatigable efforts of a Civil Servant by the name George Turnour.

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St. Josephs College in Colombo: Its Multi-faceted Achievements over 125 Years

Lynn Ockersz, in The Island, 13 June  2022, where the title runs thus St. Joseph’s College, Colombo – a dignified 125 years”

One hundred and twenty-five years into its existence, St. Joseph’s College, Colombo remains dignified and spiritually-focused in the Sri Lankan school system. Its achievements have been numerous and multidimensional over the decades but if one were to sum up the essential identity of the College, then, spiritual development would be the phrase to choose.

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Misreading the Tamil Tigers: An American Scholar in 2017

Paige Ziegler, in The Bridge, 13 April 2017, where the title is “Learning from the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam” …. reproduced here in Thuppahi, a site which has presented umpteen articles on Eelam War IV, in order to indicate [see THUPPAHI EDITOR’s NOTE at the end] how young American scholars present essays without extensive research. 

The Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam (LTTE) were a highly successful terrorist organization who were famous for successfully forming a fully functional military. Their fight for separation from the Sri Lankan government lasted a quarter century, and parallels can be drawn between the Sri Lankan conflict and the current situation in the Middle East (and elsewhere). With civilian casualties reaching staggering numbers and negotiations leading nowhere, Sri Lanka had elected a new government and, with it, a new approach. By leveraging popular support, utilizing external countries to manage the conflict, and employing strategic military measures, the new Sri Lankan government recovered its country. Duplicating similar political actions and military maneuvers as those that proved successful for the Sri Lankan government may usher in peace for the Middle East.

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Hail the Sri Lankan Cricket Fans: Joe Paiva’s Pictorial Applause from Adelaide:

Joe Paiva’s Colourful Applause from Adelaide

Congratulations the People of Lanka for welcoming the Aussies with open arms and warm hospitality. This is the Sri Lankan way.

 Cricket Australia take special note and reciprocate, when overseas teams grace our  great, multicultural continent…. Australia. In the past Australia has treated foreign team shabbily. That now must change. It is sport not war. Sri Lanka despite its dire situation has shown the world how it should be done.

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General Custer’s Last Stand: Annihilation by the Sioux, 25 June 1876

David Graham, in Quora, …. https://www.quora.com/What-are-some-of-the-most-epic-last-stands-in-history/answer/David-Graham-149 

On June 25, 1876, after a stumbling night march that exhausted men and horses, Lieutenant Colonel George Armstrong Custer and the 7th U.S. Cavalry attacked Sitting Bull’s village on the banks of the Little Bighorn River in southeastern Montana.

What happened next: Lakota Sioux and Northern Cheyenne warriors under the war chiefs Crazy Horse, Gall and Two Moon wiped out all 210 officers and men in the five companies of cavalry under Custer’s immediate command. 

  Custer marker on Last Stand Hill | Photo: David Graham

 

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Memories are Made of This: The Agar-Hewawissa-Plunkett-Forbes Lineages of Ceylon

Charles Schokman

This picture brought back memories. I knew Ashton Agar’s Great Grandfather from way back in Ceylon (now Sri Lanka). Mr. Plunkett worked at Walker Sons & Co Ltd as a car salesman and resided at Negombo. He had two daughters Sheila and Carmaline. (Bubbles). Sheila was married to Nala Hewawissa and Carmaline to Ron Forbes.

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