Category Archives: population

Sri Lankans in Australia: 2016 Census Data …… The Demographic Profile

Item sent to Thuppahi by Victor Melder ….  at https://www.abs.gov.au/census/find-census-data/quickstats/2016/7107_0 …. presented here with some selective highlights from the Thuppahi pen

People 109,853
Male 57,280
Female 52,573
Australian citizen 60.3%
Not an Australian citizen 38.3%

Families 43,816
Couples with children 26,914
Couples without children 13,326
One parent families 2,972
Other families 592

All private dwellings 52,548
Median monthly mortgage repayment $2,100
Median weekly rent paid $351

 

Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under accountability, Australian culture, australian media, communal relations, demography, economic processes, education, ethnicity, governance, heritage, historical interpretation, immigration, island economy, legal issues, life stories, literary achievements, performance, population, self-reflexivity, sri lankan society, travelogue, unusual people, working class conditions, world events & processes

Aussie Testosterone for Arabia! Australian Camels in High Demand

Noah Yim, in The Australian, 18 August 2022, where the title readsAussie mums for richest pickings of camel crop” …. while the highlighting is the hand of The Editor, Thuppahi

These mums could give birth to the Arabian Peninsula’s next top models. Wild Australian camels are highly sought after as surrogate mothers to the most prized beauty pageant and racing camels in the Middle East, courting millions of dollars from kings and sheiks in order to continue the progeny free of diseases.

Continue reading

2 Comments

Filed under accountability, arab regimes, Australian culture, australian media, charitable outreach, cultural transmission, economic processes, elephant tales, female empowerment, life stories, performance, population, taking the piss, the imaginary and the real, tolerance, welfare & philanthophy

From Ceylon to Australia: Migrant Journeys, 1860s-to-2010s

Earl Forbes, whose chosen title in The Ceylankan is “Ceylon/Sri Lanka to Australia: Arrivals and Survival”

Ceylonese/Sri Lankans have entered Australia for a variety of reasons during the past one and a half centuries.  The far greater number of these arrivals occurred in the second half of the twentieth century and first two decades of the 21st century.  Early arrivals go as far back as the last two decades of the nineteenth century.

Figure 3  Queensland sugarcane plantation workers. … [placed as frontispiece because of its striking character

Continue reading

3 Comments

Filed under accountability, Australian culture, australian media, authoritarian regimes, British colonialism, centre-periphery relations, cultural transmission, demography, discrimination, economic processes, ethnicity, governance, historical interpretation, human rights, island economy, landscape wondrous, legal issues, life stories, people smugglers, performance, politIcal discourse, population, power politics, racist thinking, refugees, self-reflexivity, Sinhala-Tamil Relations, sri lankan society, Tamil migration, transport and communications, travelogue, unusual people, welfare & philanthophy, working class conditions, world events & processes

Gerald Peiris’s POLITICAL CONFLICT IN SOUTH ASIA …. 2013

Details of this book  POLITICAL CONFLICT IN SOUTH ASIA, University of Peradeniya publication, 2013 …………. ISBN – 978-955-589-169-1………..Enquiries should be addressed to the publisher,  The Vice-Chancellor, University of Peradeniya, Peradeniya, Sri Lanka

Printed by Balin & Co. (Pvt.) Ltd.  61, D. S. Senanayake Street, Kandy, Sri Lanka +94 0817429050 ……………. Fax. +94 081 2222584 ………………………… Cover design: Dr. Manjula Peiri

Respectfully dedicated to the memory of Sir Nicholas Atygalle, Vice Chancellor of the University Ceylon (1955-66),  and my teachers: Karthigesu Kularatnam & George Thambyahpillay at Peradeniya, and Bertram Hughes Farmer at Cambridge

 

 

Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under accountability, authoritarian regimes, centre-periphery relations, communal relations, constitutional amendments, democratic measures, demography, discrimination, economic processes, electoral structures, ethnicity, foreign policy, fundamentalism, governance, historical interpretation, human rights, Indian General Elections, Indian Ocean politics, Islamic fundamentalism, language policies, Left politics, legal issues, life stories, LTTE, modernity & modernization, nationalism, parliamentary elections, patriotism, politIcal discourse, population, power politics, Presidential elections, propaganda, security, self-reflexivity, Sinhala-Tamil Relations, sri lankan society, Tamil civilians, transport and communications, truth as casualty of war, unusual people, war reportage, welfare & philanthophy, world events & processes

Leonard Woolf’s Remarkable Novel

Nick Rankin, in BBCnews, 23 May 2014, where the title runs thus: “Leonard Woolf’s forgotten Sri Lankan novel” …… The Bloomsbury Group and Sri Lanka are rarely spoken of in the same breath, but that is partly because Leonard Woolf’s groundbreaking first novel, The Village in the Jungle, is unjustly ignored, argues writer and broadcaster Nick Rankin.

She was born Virginia Stephen, daughter of the Victorian bookman Sir Leslie Stephen, but when she married in 1912, her name changed to Virginia Woolf, and she went on to become the best-known woman writer of the 20th Century.

 

Her lesser-known husband, Leonard Woolf, however, wrote and published a novel first. That almost forgotten book, first published in 1913, is called The Village in the Jungle and it is a remarkable work because it is the first novel in English literature to be written from the indigenous point of view rather than the coloniser’s.

Continue reading

1 Comment

Filed under accountability, British colonialism, Buddhism, cultural transmission, economic processes, governance, heritage, historical interpretation, island economy, landscape wondrous, life stories, literary achievements, population, self-reflexivity, sri lankan society, the imaginary and the real, travelogue, unusual people, working class conditions

Portuguese Creole in Sri Lanka: Faint Traces & Remnants

Dr Hugo Cardoso, a linguist from the University of Lisbon and his team who have been researching this historical language spoken in the East of Sri Lanka have now taken to social media to preserve this fast fading heritage.

Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under accountability, Afro-Asians, communal relations, cultural transmission, economic processes, ethnicity, heritage, historical interpretation, Indian traditions, landscape wondrous, life stories, population, Portuguese in Indian Ocean, self-reflexivity, sri lankan society, travelogue, working class conditions, world events & processes

Portuguese Creole in Sri Lanka in Performative Mode

SHIHAN DE SILVA JAYASURIYA presents her interview with Udena Wickremasooriya (son of Gerald Wickremasooriya, founder of Sooriya records) from you tube…. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zil7pncoEkM

Thuppahi also presents “the recordings that Sooriya Records in Colombo   made a few years ago for posterity. There are 4 links for the 4 songs below.”

Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under art & allure bewitching, cultural transmission, economic processes, ethnicity, heritage, historical interpretation, island economy, landscape wondrous, life stories, performance, population, sri lankan society, travelogue, unusual people, world events & processes

Australia’s “Whitey” Parliament of Yesteryear

Frances Mao, BBC News, Sydney 20 May 2022, where the title runs as “Australia election: Why is Australia’s parliament so white?”

 Some of Australia’s MPs, pictured here, fail to reflect the country’s diversity, critics say

Australia is one of the most multicultural nations in the world, but it’s a different story in the country’s politics, where 96% of federal lawmakers are white. With this year’s election, political parties did have a window to slightly improve this. But they chose not to in most cases, critics say.

Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under accountability, Australian culture, australian media, China and Chinese influences, communal relations, cultural transmission, democratic measures, demography, economic processes, electoral structures, ethnicity, heritage, historical interpretation, immigration, life stories, parliamentary elections, performance, politIcal discourse, population, self-reflexivity, tolerance, world events & processes

When Ceylon was under Attack by the Japanese Imperial Thrust, 1942

Jayantha Somasundaram, in The Island, 8 April 2022, where the title runs thus: “The Turn of the Tide”

Eighty years ago on Easter Sunday 5th April 1942, Ceylon came under attack by a Japanese armada. The Battle for Ceylon was going to be a duel of skill, nerves and grit between the pilots of the approaching Japanese Carrier Fleet and the RAF fighter pilots defending Ceylon.

On 26th March 1942 Vice-Admiral Chūichi Nagumo Commander-in-Chief of the Japanese Imperial Navy’s main aircraft carrier force, sailed out of Kendari in the Celebes (now Sulawesi in Indonesia). It consisted of the First Air Fleet with the carriers the Akagi, the Hiryu, the Soryu, the Shokaku and the Zuikaka, along with the Third Battle Squadron made up of the battleships the Haruna, the Hiei, the Kirisbima and the Kongo, accompanied by two heavy cruisers and ten destroyers heading for Ceylon. “In striking power” says naval historian H. P Willmott of the US Naval Institute in Empires in the Balance, “virtually the same as the force used against Pearl Harbour.” Continue reading

2 Comments

Filed under authoritarian regimes, British colonialism, historical interpretation, landscape wondrous, law of armed conflict, life stories, military strategy, politIcal discourse, population, power politics, security, sri lankan society, transport and communications, trauma, war reportage, world events & processes, World War II and Ceylon

Obeyesekere’s New Book on the Kandyan Kingdom

Uditha Devapriya, reviewing Gananath Obeyesekere’s new book The Many Faces of the Kandyan Kingdom (1591-1765) Colombo, Perera-Hussein, 2020, 200 pp., Rs. 1,200 ... with ‘arbitrary’ highlighting imposed by the Editor, Thuppahi

In 1602, the year of the Dutch East India Company’s founding, Joris van Spilbergen reached the shores of Sri Lanka after setting sail from the seaport of Veere in Holland a year earlier. Tasked with opening up trade negotiations with the King of Kandy, Vimaladharmasuriya, Spilbergen bore with him a letter from the Prince of Orange, acknowledging their willingness to counter the Portuguese. Not for one moment underestimating the Portuguese presence in the island, though, they disembarked at Batticaloa, which fell under the jurisdiction of the Kandyan Court. They anchored off the coast on May 31.

 

Continue reading

1 Comment

Filed under accountability, art & allure bewitching, authoritarian regimes, British imperialism, Buddhism, centre-periphery relations, discrimination, economic processes, ethnicity, heritage, historical interpretation, Indian religions, Indian traditions, Kandyan kingdom, landscape wondrous, life stories, Muslims in Lanka, politIcal discourse, population, Portuguese in Indian Ocean, power politics, religiosity, sri lankan society, the imaginary and the real, transport and communications, travelogue, unusual people, world events & processes