Category Archives: meditations

Hopeless Dreams: Those Weighed Down by Poverty in Sri Lanka

Elmo Jayawardena in Elanka and in The Island, mid-October 2022,where the title runs “What colour is your parachute?” … presented here with highlighting imposed by The Editor, Thuppahi

A few years ago there was an extremely popular book in North America called “What Colour is Your Parachute?

 

 

 

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Karunatilaka’s Supernatural Satire secures Booker Prize

Helen Bushby,* in BBC.com, 20 October 2022, where the title runs thus: “Booker Prize 2022: Sri Lankan author Shehan Karunatilaka wins with supernatural satire”

The Seven Moons of Maali Almeida by Shehan Karunatilaka, a supernatural satire set amid a murderous Sri Lankan civil war, has won the Booker Prize. The Sri Lankan writer’s novel is about a photographer who wakes up dead, with a week to ask his friends to find his photos and expose the brutality of war.

 

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Julia Margaret Cameron’s Classic 19th Century Photographs

Michael Roberts presenting an Arbitrary Collection of the pioneer camerawoman and de facto female ‘suffragette’ … Julia Margaret Cameron nee Pattle (1815-1879)

Julia in her prime

Julia in 1870

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Julia Margaret Cameron: Her Journeys, Camerawork & Gravestone at Bogawantalawa

George Braine, in The Island, 10 October 2022, where the title reads thus: Irrepressible Julia Margaret Cameron at peace in Bogawantalawa” … with highlighting imposed by The Editor, Thuppahi

Some years ago, my sister, BIL, and I drove to the Dimbula area, visiting Anglican churches and graveyards looking for evidence of our ancestors. At the quaint St. Mary’s Church, Bogawantalawa, we found the grave of my grand uncle, Frank Wyndham Becher Braine, who died on March 9, 1879, at only 11 months. We may have been the first family members to visit his grave in more than a 100 years.

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Collective Selves and the Promise of Buddhaland in Nationalism

Brian Victoria, in Buddhistdoor.net  … where the title reads as “Nationalism: Collective Selves and the Promise of Buddhaland”

Introduction

In a recent lecture on the war in the Ukraine, John Mearsheimer, a political scientist at the University of Chicago, noted that nationalism is the strongest ideology in the world today. I was somewhat surprised by his comment because, having lived through the Cold War era, anything having to do with Russia was framed in the ideological context of “the struggle of the Free World or democracies against Communist dictatorship,” and so on. Yet, on reflection, I realized that with the collapse of the Soviet Union in December 1991, Russia had reverted to a capitalist state, even if now authoritarian or autocratic. Thus, Mearsheimer’s identification of nationalism as a key factor behind Russia’s invasion of Ukraine was not as surprising as it initially seemed.

Buddhist monks protest against aid for Rakhine’s Rohingya Muslims. Photo by Soe Zeya Tun. From reuters.com

Mearsheimer’s insight led to a new line of enquiry on my part. As a Buddhist, I had long asked myself, without finding a satisfactory answer, what is the relationship, if any, of the Buddhadharma with nationalism?

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A Tamil Saivite Temple in Australia: Sustaining Community Amidst Linguistic Diversity

A Notice re a NEW BOOK on the negotiation of language and identity in a Tamil Saivite Temple in Australia by NILRUKSHI PERERA

Diversity is a buzzword of our times and yet the extent of religious diversity in Western societies is generally misconceived. This ground-breaking research draws attention to the journey of one migrant religious institution in an era of religious superdiversity.

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A Cliffhanger! Sri Lankan Cricketers overcome Stiff Bangladesh Total

Andrew Fidel Fernando, in ESPNcricinfo, 2 September 2022, where the title runs “Sri Lanka: merely lucky, or back to punching-above-weight ways?”

In a match that swung wildly one way, then the other, the optimists among you had reason enough to believe this Sri Lanka team is resurgent.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Asitha Fernando (left) on T20I debut hit the winning runs for Sri Lanka — AFP/Getty Images Continue reading

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Homage to Andrew Symonds from Australian Cricket & Townsville

Andrew McGlashan in ESPNcricinfo, 28 August 2022, where the title runs thus “Roy 388: Townsville pays tribute to Andrew Symonds”

 Symonds‘ children were at the centre of tributes to him during the opening ODI between Australia and Zimbabwe in Townsville.
The outfield was emblazoned with Roy 388 – Symonds’ nickname and Test cap number – in memory of the former allrounder who died in a car accident west of Townsville in May.

Andrew Symonds’ family and friends honour him in Townsville  •  Getty Images Continue reading

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Irony. Defiance. Salman Rushdie’s Appreciation of the Everyday within the Heat of the Fatwa

Fintan O’Toole, in The Irish Times, 15 August 2022, where the title runs “The first time I met Salman Rushdie, the very idea of it was unimaginable”  ………..  reproduced here with highlights imposed by The Editor, Thuppahi   &*&

The first time I met Salman Rushdie, the very idea of meeting Salman Rushdie was unimaginable. It was after the Ayatollah Khomeini issued his fatwa against him. Rushdie had disappeared from the face of the earth.

By refusing to subsist in living death they prescribed for him, the author stood up for life itself as the ordinary human birthright.

 

 

I went to a party in County Wicklow. Seeing him standing in the kitchen with a glass of wine was like meeting Lazarus.

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Will Pucovski’s Cricketing Headblows and His Lifeworld Thereafter

Interview by Srinidhi Ramanujam 18-Aug-2022 …. at ESPNcricinfo, where the title runs thus “Will Pucovski on his multiple concussions: ‘It’s been a reality check – there’s so much more to life’, ”  .... https://www.espncricinfo.com/story/will-pucovski-on-his-multiple-concussions-its-been-a-reality-check-theres-so-much-more-to-life-1329372
The Australia batter talks about how dealing with repeated trauma to the head has changed his outlook on life, his red-ball ambitions, and learning to not be defined by cricket alone

Pucovski suffered his ninth concussion just before his Test debut, when playing for Australia A against Indians in December 2020•—-  Getty Images

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